Untangled Health

Consumers Unite To Drive The Changes We Need

Tag: #cost of care

An advocate gets busy while every politician and “talking head” takes credit for healthcare model ideas published long ago.

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

I watched Barbara Starfield again last night. She passed away in 2011 but it seamed as though she was sitting in my living room telling me everything will be alright but many of us will never get our way. Barbara spent several decades studying the characteristics of health systems all over the world. Her final conclusions were simple and easy to implement as long as social agreements were made between consumers of healthcare services and their providers. The contract (sort of) is that my primary care doctor will be available when needed if I promise to contact his or her office before going to the ER for an earache or other non-emergent condition; my doctor also agrees to follow my care as I transition through life stages and address all mental and physical health conditions as they arise by assuring I connect with the correct specialist if required. The specialists in return are in constant contact with my primary care doctor so the primary care clinic is coordinating continuous and comprehensive care and reviewing all interactions between myself and other medical environments. Like I said earlier this week. Someone to watch over me. I first learned of Dr. Starfield in 2001 and followed her publications. Funny, she was never accepted to sit on any best-practice boards but the scientific community considered her work to be spectacular in terms of statistical approach and quality. In other words, she looked for the null hypothesis also.

Again…concerns over repeal and replace.

Some more diatribe with hope at sarcastic humor is written for you below. Please follow through to the end as I pasted a really cool graphic pointing you to a new society of consumers and professionals that might fix the system over the long run.

The conversation doesn’t stop at my dinner table, on my phone, through IM or Facebook. It seems as though my popularity index took a healthy bump after November 8th, 2016. I wish I could be happy about the reasons for the traffic.
“Jeff, you are on Medicare are you concerned?”

Well yes; you see, as we become older the likelihood of needing assistance from case managers, specialists, short stays in skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities increases. Same with home health services which is always the preferred place to recover from the self-inflicted fractured hip that occurred while my masculine ego informed me of my capacity to clean out my gutters.
One of the most important changes to the clinical language coming from Obamacare is the right for all patients cared for by primary care doctors with Medicare contracts to receive “Coordinated, Comprehensive Care”. Lately you might have heard the terms: “Patient Centered Care” or “Medical Home”. You probably heard President Elect Trump mention “Patient Centered” or a new commercial by Humana presented by a handsome young doctor stating that Humana’s system of Patient Centered Care is superior because of their capacity to coordinate your care within their “medical community”. Then you will watch a local conservative pundit state: “those stupid narrow networks tried through Obamacare didn’t work: here is a toast to repeal and replace.
This stuff cracks me up for the same proponents of patient centered care realize that closely collaborating narrow networks can provide you with clinical personnel that understand your needs better than anyone else! In fact, they have the same attributes of a Patient Centered Care Team using a single medical record and plan of care to increase safety and minimize mistakes. Yet you will hear no one (perhaps save me and a few of us that are tired of scraping the poop off our boots) tell you that the words Patient Centered, Narrow Network, Accountable Outcomes, Value Added Payment, Medical Homes, and all other terms implying a tightly coordinated, error free clinical team surrounding all patients are not original concepts. In fact, they are in place in many of our successful neighbor nations who provide universal enrollment and have always demonstrated lower reliance on emergency room services for basic medicine, better health outcomes and no difference in treatment effectiveness for cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other leading causes of premature mortality. Our own CMS (The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) have published the policy here July 2016:
So all of a sudden the administration of 2017 will be using terminology invented by others to describe care models that work after years of academic surveillance by healthcare policy analysists and already written into The Patient Protection Affordable Care Act or what the opponents call “Obama-Care”.
My prediction is we will keep the new payment systems for coordinated care and chronic disease care management. However, the credit for the success will fall under a new Trump label. My fears is that the same three insurance companies comprising the oligopoly of payers for American Healthcare will recoup their lost profits of mandated care without premium inflation for the chronically ill by shifting the premiums higher for those with pre-existing conditions. So here is another question from the week:
“Jeff, what will I do now I couldn’t get covered because of my history of cancer before the ACA?” “What if “Trump-care” requires coverage for pre-existing illnesses but allows insurance companies to include the illness in the premium pricing model? “ My response to this question was “not sure, my cost in the NC High Risk Insurance Pool for my diabetes prior to Obamacare was $1200.00 per month not including co-pays. Today it is $350.00.
More on Patient Centered Care AKA Medical Homes AKA Integrated Care AKA Chronic Illness Care.
I discussed the integrated care model and its payment adjustments to my Men’s group on Thursday night as they requested a primer on planning for their last ten years of life. Their hope was that our system of care had evolved and they would not have to lose their homes to cover the long-term care charges. Many of the guys in my group neglected to buy long term care insurance when they were young and healthy, had since suffered a chronic disease diagnosis and episode of treatment and no longer qualified for long term care insurance. They could however place $10 K per month into an account to pre-pay up to one year of long term care. This is what my father did: In 2006 he entered into a contract with a transitional care organization. He paid them $350,000 for full access to assisted living and long term care until his death. They also allowed him to live in the attached apartment complex for independent seniors for an additional rent of $3200 per month including one meal per day. Not a bad deal eh? Oh yeah…one more oversight: My friends ; all retired upper middle class professionals had no idea that Medicare didn’t pay for long term custodial care either in home or inpatient facility.
Now, like I said the other day, I am a bit tired of shouting the truth to those who were unfortunate enough to buy into the following promise: “Oh we will have the most wonderful healthcare system in the world” and “We promise to repeal the expensive policies and replace with something better.
We were on our way folks: The biggest mistake, President Obama’s team was denied the necessary Medicaid expansion for ALL not SOME States by our supreme courts. If you don’t understand the math I will be pleased to describe it in another column. Basically when the folks that would have had access to Medicaid don’t receive the insurance they still consume services. The loss of revenue winds up on the balance sheets of hospitals and providers and they respond by increasing their cost per service. The insurance companies pay more and your premiums increase. So… my neighbors policy (55 year old male) in NC costs $11,000 per year. The very same policy in New Hampshire where they expanded Medicaid costs $5,500 per year. As Mr. Obama leaves keep in mind that the rate of increase in health costs since the inception of Obama Care is the lowest it has been in 40 years.
Somehow, someway; we need to cover everybody. If we do not we cannot cover the losses incurred in the private sector without the Magical Thinking that has been sold you for so many decade. Hide the losses, get others to pay for the losses through modest increases in cost of living and blame the doctors, and hospitals who give away more free care than you could ever imagine.
What would happen if our incredible consumer driven internet harnessed the decision support technology that we use daily on Amazon and instantly brings the right service to you when needed should you or a loved one become ill? What if we harnessed IBM Watson to make the diagnosis thereby reducing error rates and reducing unnecessary utilization of expensive diagnostic procedures?
What if we didn’t need insurance companies any more to assess population risk and perform preauthorization services while we waited for our new medication?
Since we have all of the data connecting lifestyle, culture, nutrition, infection and the human genome can anyone appreciate where we are headed with our capacity to discover the cause of disease and effect of treatment? This is not decades from now my friends; it is within the reach of our children’s lifetime. I have wonderful friends with incredible scientific minds that are creating open source technologies to accomplish human collaboration like humankind has never witnessed. The only barrier to their success is a loss of priority to cure disease, increase well-being and expand the functional-years of human life.
Or…we can keep these technologies secret, forget those we have developed through the natural sequestration of competing private enterprise and traditional silo thinking. If this is where we are headed then the best investment to assure a painless end of life if you are not surrounded by humanitarian friends is my undying support for the second amendment. If you catch my drift.

Check out Right Care Folks!

Right Care Now

Right Care Now

Wait, Wait, Don’t Kill Me; I have my data and you don’t! A Chronic Disease Patients Point of View Part 1

 

A 33 year veteran worker from the US HealthCare Industry who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1966 describes his  realization that health care efficiency solutions must first address social and business barriers prior to implementing technology and hope for the future.

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Keeping our eye on the ball: Let us not forget why we showed up over these last few years and started shouting out!

A small sample of issues that we learned about in the last fifteen years:

  • Disproportionate Growth in Healthcare Costs (greater than GDP and growing as a multiple of consumer price index) with poorer health outcomes
  • Disparities in care and care outcomes directly related to personal income. (as family income falls so does family health)
  • Lack 0f availability of critical, decision influencing data when and where we are treated (The Patient Information Gap) arising from lack of governance of data exchange between industry segments, physicians and payers at local, State and Federal levels, (often hidden behind well intentioned efforts to secure the privacy of patients).
  • Reliance on antique point of care exam model: Patient and family as historian.
  • Poor price transparency due to confusing and always changing industry syntax such as: Facility charge, Allowed amount, Deductible, Co-Pay, Co-insurance, Patients responsibility, Cost Sharing, Plan Type, Episode of care; Discharging to next lower level of care;  Medical Savings Account appeared to us as a shell game where we would always find our total cost out of pocket living under a different shell!
  • Certification processes: JCAHO Ambulatory, JCAHO Hospital, NCQA, URAC, CARF, Insurance Company’s Center of Excellence! What does it all mean! 
  • Questionable ethics of pharmaceutical industry: Tiers level 1,2,3,4. When our doctors told us they prefered a brand drug because of evidence that the drug was more effective but the insurance company required we pay 4X cost of their PBMs generic who do we trust! Will I die because I spent $200 less per month on my medication than my Dr.Recommended?
  • Numerous Business to Business relationships that supposedly have value for payers but only decrease the size of the consumers wallet. What is a PBM anyway? A Pharmacy Benefits Manager! You mean my medical insurance company needs another company to manage the medications!!!!
  • Disease Management Companies: Nurse calls me monthly who works for Depression Institute LLC who evidently subcontracts (like the pharmacy benefit manager) to my insurance company or my employer. She asks me if I am” downhearted and blue.” I say “yes” and she sends me some uplifting books and websites to look into. Meanwhile I would like to see a therapist because I am loosing function at work due to diabetes and am very sad and can not concentrate. My primary care provider sees 10 patients per hour and is empathetic but can only refer me to a psychiatrist associated with his institution. The institution psychiatrist places me on multiple medications to address my depression and the nurse from the DM company calls me monthly. I feel no better. Months later I begin having heart palpitations which turn out to be a side effect of the antidepressants. I am now afraid to work out.

Then we approved the HITECH ACT, ARRA and ACA all of which contain system enhancing improvements that are to address our concerns and help us feel safer, have better health outcomes and have better consumer capacity to analyze the state of our own health, determine our care needs. plan for our care needs and finance our care. Because as we all know: We are all temporarily able-bodied individuals; that is unless we are delusional.

My mission with these next series of posts, articles and perhaps a self-care book is to frame America’s Healthcare System as it evolves in front of you. How is it that I can do this when others can not? Well many, more qualified people can. Most will not due to the shackles of our industry and survival instinct. Ezekiel Emanuel will lay it all out for you if you listening to a compassionate physician who gets the big picture. For now: I am no longer dependent on this industry to support me. I have no fear of exposing the truth including those elements of my past that cause me to carry shame, anger, fear and a substantial amount of JOY. The truth is; all of the commentary I have heard at cocktail parties attended by physicians, employers, patient rights groups, hospital administrators, nurses, mixtures of all levels of worker-bees is beautiful material and quite humorous. If you are a healthcare worker and are reading this than you know this material is true. If you are recently graduated from your professional training venue whether it be nursing. medical school or other and you find my words a bit offensive then please forgive me and disengage 

So for now: Let’s get started, I welcome all feedback as this material comes belching forth from my repressed memory and will try to frame my words with ego disengaged.

 

My first experience with accidental death bordering on murder:
In 1982 I experienced one of three medical errors in my career that culminated in a person’s death. I was 26 years old so I took it less seriously than I do now: but it was the start of a change in consciousness regarding my thoughts on communication breakdown within the care delivery system. Ultimately this one focus would become my life’s pursuit.
Setting: A beautiful, crisp fall day in New Hampshire, My duties that day were respiratory therapist ‘on call’ for code blue (resuscitation events): A man of about fifty walked into our emergency room noticeably distraught. “I can’t catch my breath he said, it feels like my heart is coming out of my chest”. We took him immediately to our trauma room where all of the equipment would be available should we need to perform complex procedures (temporary pacemakers etc). Laying him down on the gurney the EKG technician hooked him up to the monitor and I reached up to turn it on. My job was to assist the team if the patient arrested and then intubate and ventilate him upon order of the physician. What I saw on the EKG appeared to be a life threatening rhythm yet the physician ran into the room and announced the rhythm to be less threatening  which requires a completely different treatment approach: So I figured “well he is the doc and knows much more than little old me”. This was back in the days when a patient’s personal physician could deliver direct care in the ER as opposed to a board certified emergency room physician. This Navy Dr. was quite sure of himself and demanded respect. At the time the Dr’s diagnosis called for electrical cardioversion with a defibrillator to establish a normal rhythm so I began preparing the defibrillator. However, this was 1982 and we had a new cardiologist on staff so the Dr. in charge thought it best to ask the cardiologist if there was a less traumatic way to correct the patient’s rhythm. He yelled out Hey Dr. XXXX; what is the standard for cardioversion for intraventricular tachycardia? Now keep in mind that the nurse and I were concerned that this was a missed diagnosis and that the patient was in-fact having a heart attack.  We spoke up at this point but were dismissed due to our lower level of credentials RCP and RN vs. MD. The cardiologist said “there is a great new class of drugs that have been used for years in Europe they are Calcium Inlet Channel Blocking agents. Give your patient 4 mg of Verapamil! So our esteemed leader –without running the EKG to show it to the cardiologist pulled up 10 mg of verapamil –not 4 into a 3cc syringe and handed it to the nurse. “You will be okay in a minute Mr. Smith said his doctor, we will take your shortness of breath away shortly by giving you this drug”. The poor man was terrified and his horror made worse when my nurse friend refused to push the drugs into the patient’s IV. Dr. (Navy Save the Day) said “Fine I will do it”; injected the medicine, looked at the patient and then up at the EKG monitor. Mr. Smith sat straight up in bed, grabbed his chest and fell unconscious. As we looked at the monitor we could see that there was a clear EKG rhythm but the patient had no blood pressure nor could we feel a pulse. He had stopped breathing and his eyes were wide open with pupils dilatesd.We worked on the poor man for almost an hour. I intubated him and started ventilating while the nurse began chest compressions. The cardiologist had come into the room to take over the resuscitation effort. As soon as he looked at Mr. Smith’s first EKG he knew that he and the other doctor had made a terrible mistake. Had he looked at the EKG before recommending verapamil he would have labeled the rhythm as acute myocardial infarction with ventricular tachycardia and suggested defibrillation immediately.  What confused the patients doctor who had little clinical experience in cardiology was the fact that his patient was walking and talking.One is taught in school that a person usually loses consciousness when in “V-Tach” however, those of us who spent hours our lives reading 24 hour EKG recordings knew that many patients with good strong heart muscle can be in this rhythm while having coffee with a friend and simply complain of some shortness of breath. So this was an old-school clinical decision support error: the wrong diagnosis (bad data) given to the cardiologist (software decision support engine) caused the report (feedback loop) to the patient’s doctor to recommend the wrong therapy. Taking the advice the physician administered verapamil caused the patient’s cardiac muscle to stop contracting due to the lack of exchange of calcium across the cell membrane.

The patient’s wife arrived 30 minutes later to be informed that her partner had died from a heart attack. It’s hard to forget the screams of agony one hears throughout a career in the hospital ER. There was no incident report or mortality round on this case. The nurse and I were dumbfounded as the patient’s physician took off his gloves, through them on the patient’s chest and said “that’s the last time I ever take advice from a cardiologist”!

What I have just illustrated is a failure to communicate and validate; even in the presence of communication technology. Years later we would have computerized EKG interpretation algorithms that were often ignored due to as lack of trust in the computer. After a decade or so the interpretation algorithms became spot on and many stopped arguing with the machine.

I always wondered after this event “would this happen to me?”

Our time has come: In my opinion we have some brilliant people speaking to the topic of healthcare reform and its multiple components today. The same personalities have formed organizations that bring patients into the fold of healthcare transformation such as the Society for Participatory Medicine and its Sister E-Patients.net.

Furthermore research has confirmed that some basic tenants of care are major correlates of lower cost and higher health outcomes. These are ease of access to a primary care physician, assurance that the primary care physician treats the patient with comprehensive techniques; assurance that the primary care physicians practice coordinates the patient’s care as he or she develops new conditions and problems and requires interventions from other providers or facilities such as hospitals. Furthermore there is evidence that if the primary care database is queried on a regular basis to identify patients with chronic disease that have not been seen or are experiencing a deterioration in health status that populations can be identified and engaged well before they show up in the local emergency room. This type of procedure is titled Population Medicine.

So here we are with all this knowledge and interest. On top of that we approved a National program for the expansion of electronic medical record technology under the Bush administration. This HITECH bill was primarily a jobs creation bill but it was to create something of immeasurable value for us patients, doctors and our loved ones. A single record or location on the internet called a portal where any one clinician that might have an interest in caring for us would be presented with a thorough historical record of our problems, diseases, interventions, therapeutic outcomes, medicines etc. This alone was worth the billions spent since it could make our safe at a time in history when the institute of medicine was quoting over 100,000 deaths per year due to therapeutic misadventure. I call this permanent record “the life-long plan of care”

This engineering feat was not rocket science: it required technology that we had in place and a social infrastructure that we did not. By social infrastructure I mean an agreement among industry providers, provider specialities, hospital organizations, employers and insurance companies to settle on a standard clinical and business syntax defined by the context of the workflow or data flow and not interfere with the transfer of information between organizations holding information and their competitors since patients are transient. Metaphorically speaking it is similar to my exchanging the service records on my car between competing car dealerships and then downloading a copy for myself at home. In fact here is evidence that it is not happening while the private eHR companies selling their wares are owned by CEOs worth billions! Doctors challenged by data exchange

Crap! We still don’t have it! I am reading about campaigns “give me my data!” #gmmdd because evidently patients are having trouble accessing their records, test result etc.

My friends all tell me that they have been told by their providers and doctors that they have their own portal access their records, talk with their docs and download records. In fact they do. Here in the RTP area of NC I can count seven clinical portals that a patient’s clinical information may reside in. I have tested them all and have no problem downloading my personal or a friend’s personal information from each portal. This leaves me wondering if the campaign should be labeled Give Me My Data or “Wait Wait Don’t Kill Me” ,#WWDKM “I have data and you do not.” This is a much more succinct description of the problem in my world anyway. (credit to NPR for paraphrasing their wonderful show “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me”)

What scares me is that I understand the cost of sharing information and it is not just some random charge made up by vendors. You see the vendors were given three guidelines to meet for interoperable data. However, during implementation it is possible to modify the system templates thereby creating artifacts as data cross the street from hospital A where Blood Pressure means Blood Pressure and Hospital B where Blood Pressure means Respiratory Rate. These are the CCDA documents that your physicians patient portal allows you to download either in the form of a pdf document or .xml document adhering to CCDA guidelines. So where you and I can download our information, good luck uploading it into another facilities records. So, once again…I am doing what I did in 1981 and hand carrying my test results and visit summaries to each specialist and each hospital that performs surgery. From the surgery perspective it is important because I am diabetic and have a family history of hyperpyrexia; a condition where in reaction to an anaesthetic agent your body heats up to 105 degrees and starts to melt on the OR table.

So as we riot against the machine because we are afraid for our very own lives remember who the villains are: No body! The manufacturers have certified their ability to interoperate. The ONC did not consider a standard where it is suggested that you document your capacity to exchange data in all contexts: Administrative, Financial, Result Observation, Continuing Care Document Architecture Record between every known vendor of eHR software that has received the same level of accreditation. This is an oversight or someone was paid off I am not sure. All I know is that the Epic enterprise EHR is deployed in three hospital systems that I use including their partnering physicians and I am unable to transfer my data between systems without a download and manual entry of results which never make it to my medical record because patient entered data are considered unreliable. Such arrogance! Don’t you think?

Below I illustrate and describe my current processes which include the use of MS Healthvault for data consolidation. This will be part 1 of a series that I construct with the objective of embarrassing an industry that has been playing a shell game for three decades with our private and taxpayer dollars. In the end you will hopefully have more clarity on why it has never worked, why it won’t work without a change in societal attitude toward health care as a right vs commodity and how we might change the future by getting clear with our healthcare business leaders and policy wonks now about our understanding of their special interest controlled industry.

I have been reading the same complaints for three decades; I have worked in provider industries and taken advantage of others in accordance with corporate doctrine, I have struggled to get my long-term needs met as well as those of friends, neighbors and family members. I have seen us come around now through three complete cycles of “novel idea that will fix medicine” followed by “new opportunity for new industries to form and to get wealthy on the suffering of patients and the majority of the workers who provide the most nurturing experience while they earn $15.00 per hour. I have had 45-year-old physician friends throw up their hands and walk out the clinic door with tears in their eyes as they dropped their career while still paying their student loans. It goes on and on but I do not. So now, with neuropathy advancing, fingers aching from arthritis as I type I say to you: I might need to rest and bleed for a while but I ask that you carry me to the next gathering to continue the fight.

An expression of gratitude for my first $28,000 bottle of Harvoni!

Can believe NC?

Can believe NC?

Last week I published my offer to not accept resuscitation services in exchange for a full course of treatment with Harvoni, the new Direct Acting Antiviral from Gilead that has demonstrated a 95% cure rate in Hepatitis C patients with genotype 1.

In most cases insurance companies, Medicaid and Medicare is not paying for the medication unless the patient has end stage cirrhosis and is queued for transplant. The reason is easy to understand from an economic perspective yet certainly Draconian when it comes to well over 2 million people in the US who suffer with this debilitating illness. Furthermore the price discrepancy between countries is 94 X when comparing egypt and the USA for example. 

In the US a 1 month supply of Harvoni is $30,000; in Egypt it is $320.00

For more, please see my slide presentation below. For now, I want to thank Federal Employee Blue Cross for covering this medication as well as my much needed continuous ambulatory blood sugar equipment which makes this diabetic completely able bodied when away from home and alone.

 

 

I do not know how or why I was approved. Neither does my hepatology doctor. Both he and I were in tears when the fax came in through his prior approval desk. I am now in my third day of therapy. 

All I did was write a story on my blog and link it to facebook, linkedin, twitter etc. Within 24 hours my friends at Humana had retweeted my message and called me to see if they could help. They were not even my insurance company but this is a great example of how some payers are monitoring the internet for clients in need. 

Human did not get back to me but within two more days we had the approval from Federal Employee Blue Cross (my wifes health insurance). Since they are acting as secondary to my Ordinary Medicare the authorization was up to them. 

So whoever you are at Blue Cross, this is one lucky American who thanks you for the generosity to step outside most payers protocol and save my life. 

What a Christmas Present. 

 

THE POST FROM LAST WEEK

I will happily select a DNR status if you pay for my Hep C Treatment 

Hopeful

Hopeful

An economic model for exchange of value between patient and payer.

 Dear America,

I have been notified by both Medicare and Blue Cross that the technology I use for tracking my blood sugar trends will no longer be covered.

I have been notified by both Medicare and Blue Cross that the antiviral medication which has come on the market to cure my Hepatitis C will not be covered.

I would like to negotiate for coverage of these technologies using my history as a patient and known economic data regarding the cost of care at the end of life as a proposed value exchange. 

I understand that the insurance industry AND public sector should grind their teeth when presented with the $1000 per pill cost of the new therapy’s. I also imagine payers are stratifying patients needing transplant for first access to care since the drugs work on damaged livers. What I do not understand is the 287/1 disparity in cost between America and Egypt?

 

Proposed health insurance rates still closely guarded in N.C. – Greensboro – The Business Journal

Can believe NC?

Can you believe NC?

I know there is a rat around here somewhere.

I know there is a rat around here somewhere.

Here is a link to the NC Insurance Commission Oligopoly’s plans to inform its consumers of insurance rates.

Essentially, the rates are filed for 60 + plans to be released by three company’s of which Blue Cross is the only with statewide networks.

Proposed health insurance rates still closely guarded in N.C. – Greensboro – The Business Journal.

 

 

The citizens of my state are kept in the dark until Oct. 1st. After 34 years in the healthcare industry; with numerous projects and discussions with payers, providers and patient groups I can assure your readers that the decision to not publish rates on what appears to be 67 different health plans (Garner Cleveland-Record, 8/07/2013) is a proverbial ‘punch in the gut’ to the citizens of our State.

First our legislature refuses to accept the federal contributions for Medicaid Expansion, then decides to not participate in the creation of its own competitive exchange and now we are –like mushrooms; left in the dark with regard to critical information necessary for health planning.

In retirement I am working as a community educator with a focus on health services planning throughout one’s life. Most people in the US do not understand healthcare; the complex relationships between business entities; how these relationships inflate cost, an individual’s rights to receive care in accordance with best practice or the historical cost of services and products absorbed by an individual with a chronic illness such as asthma or diabetes: Let alone how to select an insurance company product by carefully evaluating future needs.

We all have the skill to purchase a car. We review the cost of the car and affordability of the monthly payment, we review Consumer Reports or Edmund online or Kelly Blue Book to ascertain future value, cost of repairs and so on. Then we make a rational decision based on the data. Or, like-me we ignore the data and purchase a car with noted mechanical issues and pray for a better outcome. Regardless of the decision we had the data to start with.

So, in October, the legislatures guaranteed oligopoly will release plan descriptions and member fees, then the consumer will need to evaluate their family health situation and make a best guess.

I plan to assist as many as possible, I do not sell any products but have worked in all three sectors of the industry, managed a disease management program and have had diabetes for 47 years along with other co-morbid complications. As the policies changed I managed to stay ahead of the challenges but it has been a struggle. I have never received accurate individualized information from an insurer, physician, or case manager who was employed by an organization fighting for its piece of the pie. The lack of alignment of value proposition alone has driven me crazy. However, when it came time for an insulin pump in 1984 as managed care took hold in America I received the equipment I needed through advocating for myself.

I predict the million or so individuals who are without insurance in North Carolina will begin receiving targeted sales and marketing information in September followed by a call from someone calling themselves a Patient Advocate. The encounter will be posed to educate the consumers when in reality the consumer will be driven like cattle into the sweet spot for the organization that employs the advocate.

It is a real shame…there are a few folks in North Carolina who can help the general public but they are scarce. To my friends in the trenches of population medicine, I ask you to step up and assist your neighbors.

Jeffrey Harris

919-779-7368

www.untangledhealth.com

Health Insurance Marketplace for Individuals | HealthCare.gov

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Untangled Health shares revised tools for the uninsured. Enjoy the experience.

Please share with friends seeking information on both individual and corporate healthcare insurance exchange. Hopefully we will all see a more affordable premium: Similar to the rates published recently  in other states such as California.

For my friends in NC…Sorry our elected officials are not willing to evolve so those with incomes below 4 times Federal Poverty Level will not qualify for less costly Medicaid insurance.   

Anyway, click on the link below.

                Revised Federal Health Insurance Marketplace