Untangled Health

Consumers Unite To Drive The Changes We Need

Tag: health economics

What is at risk if Obamacare is Rescinded

Reconciling data in my six health portals

What is at risk for all subscriber to commercial insurance programs if Obamacare is Rescinded?

This analysis with specific allegorical references was posted by my friend Wendy today. I find it accurate and far beyond my skills to interpret and describe What is at risk for EVERY-BODY

Obama Care is. . . The ACA (Affordable Care Act)
Last night as his first order of business the new president signed an executive order to repeal the ACA. Here’s what this means… even if you are safely covered behind employer-provided insurance, the protections set forth in the ACA (Affordable Care Act), apply to you too. And if those protections are repealed along with the rest (or any part) of the program, you will also be affected.
That means you may be trapped in a job, because your pre-existing condition may mean you will not qualify for new insurance offered by another employer, and the cost of private insurance would be prohibitive. If your employer shuts down, lays you off, or even changes insurers, well, you are out of luck. The Senate GOP voted this week that they would not require an eventual ACA replacement to protect against discrimination for pre-existing conditions, which was the standard before the ACA.
It means that you (a young adult under the age of 26) or your adult children (over 18) may find yourselves without the protection of insurance, as the Senate GOP voted last night that an eventual ACA replacement will not be required to allow young people to remain on their parents’ insurance up to the age of 26.
It means that if you have a high-risk pregnancy, or life-threatening illness such as cancer, you may not be able to afford all the care you need, because you may hit lifetime or annual caps. If you have an infant born with any kind of severe medical condition, or premature, they may hit their lifetime insurance cap before they are old enough to walk. The Senate GOP voted last night that an eventual ACA replacement program would not be required to prohibit lifetime insurance caps.
It means that if you are a struggling parent who is uninsured or under-insured, you will no longer be able to count on at least your kids getting the routine medical and dental care they need under the Children’s Health Insurance Plan (CHIP). The Senate GOP voted that CHIP is not required to be protected by an eventual ACA replacement.
These provisions of the ACA affect everyone in this country, not just those without insurance through their employers.
If you are not okay with these changes, call your representatives and let them know what’s important to you. Nothing has been set in stone yet, but our legislators have shown us a map of what they plan to do if constituents don’t make their voices heard loud and clear.
Hold down here to copy, paste, and post (do not share) on your timeline, if you feel this information needs to be passed on.

This is a comment from NORA on FaceBook
As a person with R.A. (pre-existing condition) Before ACA I was never able to purchase even basic insurance for under $1500 a month and thus went without insurance from the time I graduated University until I was 49 years old. It’s $2000 per visit to a Rheumatologist, so I only went once a year and could not afford medications. I lived with daily debilitating pain and exhaustion among other things. If you know somebody with RA you know is serious. ACA provided me with good affordable care at a price I can afford $359 a month. I responded very well to BASIC medications for RA that I could never afford before (but with ACA can) and am now able to live life normally and run my small business again. My great Doctors also noticed I had serious liver damage from years of taking OTC pain relievers like Tylenol and Aleve. They were able to fix that too. They said it may have killed me or become cancer without treatment, at the least led to early death. If I lose coverage for my Meds am already planning to go on SSD and Medicaid and close my business. True Story. #ACAWORKS PS Only deplorables don’t want people to have health insurance.
Like · Reply · 1 · 19 hrs · Edited
Wendy Lannon
Wendy Lannon I think of you Nora whenever I hear people say ACA doesn’t work. #ACAWORKS

SalesForce as a Patient-Centered Longitudinal Care Platform | I am one happy Diabetic!

The technology facilitating Patient Centered Care arrived over ten years ago. It was all a matter of configuration!

The technology facilitating Patient Centered Care arrived over ten years ago. It was all a matter of configuration!

I am pumped!
Years ago…1997 I believe; I had a job working for DocSite: the company founded by Physiatrist John Haughton MD that became one of the premier Registry products used as the EMR community was attempting to define itself. In the DocSite product we collected measures or “clinical indicators” that were compiled around the patient and associated with an infinity of conditions. Essentially the data design allowed physicians and grant recipients to have a single patient record yet extract, analyze and report on any constellation of outcome measures without having to spend money on redundant disease registry products. Example: Blood pressure is an important measurement for diabetes and heart failure. In diabetes the measure importance is 1) how often it is done and 2) the blood pressure value. In Heart failure the same measures of process (measurement frequency) and outcome (BP value) are required but they might be different depending on the cardiovascular guideline and contrasting diabetes guideline. In the DocSite system the blood pressure recording was simply a vital sign. The rules defining threshold for compliance with guideline were defined separately and associated with multiple conditions. When the doctor generated the data for PQRI and the Cardiovascular Excellence programs a single patient outcomes dataset was generated based on the programs associated with the patient. When the patient returned to any clinician using the Docsite system the Visit Encounter Sheet displayed the current measures due, the last values and trends for each measure and gave the physician or extender a place to generate an education note. Inexpensive, simple, multi-user, modifiable for EBG and data submission automated through clerical “generate and send PQRI data”. Now, I owned some stock in the company so I am biased but quite frankly I thought the system was elegant once it received data feeds from pharma and labs!

All of us at DocSite used a Client Relationship Management cloud application in our client services department. After using it for three years or so those of us that had worked in a previous company “the forerunner of DocSite” called Cognimed all thought that Sales Force had the proper design to create a community wide care coordination and patient centered care planning tool We had built one in the 1990s and sold it and moved on with our lives.
Today I see SalesForce has entered the arena. Knowing what I know about its capabilities I hope they capture the market by landslide. Please if you thinking about building a new care management platform…dont. As a patient, I would love to see this thing as an App. in all of my clinicians hands and on my IPhone please. Check out their demo. I am sure it all does not work as advertised but I can attest to the fact that they had the correct data model ten years ago!

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Time to pull the sheet out from underneath healthcare in America. In one step. Eliminate Insurance, Medicare, Government Programs, and see what we come up with. Please leave a note on my grave as to the outcome.

someone-to-watch

Thank you friends from LinkedIn today. Those discussing our frustration and describing a need to sit down and discuss the disaster that was and the disaster that will be.

Without action that-is!

Rephrased: My friend states our Medical system is far to complicated and polluted with bad ideas to resolve through a bunch of silo business meetings of silo organizations who define for us consumers exactly what health is, what we need to consume to maintain it and how much we should pay!

My point was to provoke: Strictly because I have similar judgments. I recently have seminar to senior men on functional decline over life for avg American male. Then overlay of possible interventions and services through death. Then described business layer and regulatory layer.
Your point Bruce Pisetzner is precisely why we need to define the pain for all stakeholders. When I say “stakeholder” I include consumers from all socio-economic classes as well as the professionals who treat them and the “business opportunities” created between 1965 and today that supposedly state a clear value added to the system of care.
Spent my career sketching iterations of your shell games. It seems to me: and I hold a straw-man judgment; that 1) as a country we have no agreement on what “health”is e.g. functional status, emotional status, absence of disease, bio-psychosocial well being etc. Far too much room to allow a free-market enterprise to explode without revisiting what is necessary to achieve healthy population goals.
Then of course we have the employer – employee entanglement.
Then of course the Government – Defined Benefit issue.
As patient with chronic disease, provider – admin acute care for 8, provider-admin post acute for 10, HIT product architect for 10 and community healthcare integration consultant for 10; predictive analyst for 8: I have watched the money flow. Oh how I have watched the money flow. Some even into my pocket. $25K a year out to stay alive and well with diabetes.
Perhaps it is time we all tell the truth. Insurance company, Large Employers, Small Employers, Provider Types, Patient Types and so on.

I created this blog post on the fly but thought it important to get out here now!

cropped-stcroix-jeff.pngsevere retinopathy

From Obama to ObamaTrumpCare

someone-to-watch

Someone to watch over me…….
Dear Doctor, will you please make sure I receive the RIGHT CARE!
What do you know about me Doc?
Do you have time to spend with me today; perhaps discuss who I am in the world, what my goals are and what I think might help me feel better?
Are you interested in my Well-Being? Do you and your staff ever discuss Well-Being or is it all veiled in a pile of healthcare acronyms; where Well-Being is described by absence of symptoms and disease?
Do you have the opportunity to discuss my goals and interventions with my other doctors? Sometimes I am not sure you folks talk because my information: from religion and employment history to list of medicines varies between practices. I thought someone was fixing all of the electronic health record issues ten years ago?
I noticed that all of my personal physicians that I have chosen over the last fifteen years are selling their practice or merging into some sort of healthcare system that appears to be managed by the local hospital; is this a good thing? I am really not sure you see me because the person at the registration desk doesn’t recognize me and your Medical Assistant told me that you only had time for 10 a minute appointment today.
Actually, to be honest with you; I am concerned for your Well-Being Doc because you have dark circles below your eyes and tell me that you are up until 10:00 PM each night completing your records at home. I realize that the new electronic health records are cool but shouldn’t they increase your quality of life as opposed to drain any remaining discretionary time you have with your family?
Ya know Doc, I have learned allot about healthcare in my life: Yeah, some because of my training and work but mostly because I have these….”conditions”. The “conditions” have presented adequate challenge to require me to understand the “bits and pieces” that string this system together. I’ll bet you don’t learn much about being a patient in medical school. I am not sure how you could do it without adding another two years to your fourteen years of post-grad education.
Did you know that I have spent ten hours in the last month trying to get a prescription authorized? You know the prescription that makes living with RSD and diabetic neuropathy tolerable! It appears that someone didn’t install your e-prescribing system correctly; something to do with prescription received and filled acknowledgments? I don’t know Man; it seems like the fax machine and pharmacy calls worked better than this e-Rx stuff. The long and short of it is that between your practice, my insurance carrier, and my CVS pharmacy the most efficient transaction I can hope for when I am in pain is 48 hours. My “Well-Being” wasn’t so “Well” this month…..
BUT my A1c is 6.5, my blood pressure is 124/78, my immunizations and other measures of health process and management outcomes are all great. I am pleased to be one of the good data points on your quality report and certainly testify to CMS and Blue Cross that you deserve an extra 5% for your hard work. Might be nice though if I received a discount on my insulin copay for the snappy A1c that has kept my feet attached to my legs and my body out of the hospital these last 50 years.

So what is Right Care? How do we know if we get it? Is it through the Diabetes DM report? Is it through the patient satisfaction survey that I take at each and every service provider I see? They all are very similar, I wonder if anyone has ever considered a “whole system measure”; at least something better than the Service Excellence Survey that reminds me of the material sent to me by American Airlines after every business trip. By the way, I always give my providers 5 stars with the exception of the conglomerate that bought up the primary care practices; their employees seem miserable. I find it amusing that their employees all where buttons that say “Ask me about the “Name of Healthcare Institutions” WAY. I guess they all have some kind of culture that is supposed to make my experience less painful as a consumer? Perhaps more like Disney Land I suppose.
What I really long for is my diabetes pediatrician from 1965. Dr. Lipmann. He always asked me to discuss how I was feeling about school, whether I had enough to eat at home, did I have any dreams and whether or not my diabetes would prevent me from achieving my dreams. Heck, he called me on Sunday night to as how I was feeling when my urine sugars were running 4 plus. When I left his care at the age of thirteen he had illuminated an interest in human biology that has carried me through my life. On a darker side of my childhood life he also notified “Children’s Protective Services” when he discovered I was living in an alcoholic flop-house!
My friend Tony is from another country. His mom had a CVA last year. She was transported to the ER, hospitalized, transferred to a facility with real rehabilitation specialists and doctors on staff daily, discharged home with visiting nurses and therapists and returned to society as a healthy 75 year old woman who is now completely independent. Her cost? Well there was no cost to her and the average cost per person for health services in her country is 1/2 of what it is in the USA.
In meeting with my insurance adviser the other day I was informed that my healthcare cost will be more than $500,000 between now and my death; with my diabetes, RSD, neuropathy etc. I wonder how we will cover the services. I really don’t want to be one of those patients that I cared for early on in my career. You know….like the old man and WWII B17 Aviator that looked up at me shortly before he died and said “Ya know Jeff; I used to be somebody once”.
The end of his life was no different than my fathers. Dad died last year from pneumonia at the age of 87. We had just celebrated Memorial Day. He called me complaining of a chest cold and 48 hours later I found myself sitting at his bedside with new onset dementia, consolidated breath sounds, a temperature of 101 degrees and abdominal cramps. I asked the Nursing Assistant to get him a bed pan and she informed me that he “just got off the pan”. A few minutes later I overheard her complaining to her supervisor that she had no intention of getting my Pop out of bed because he was a difficult transfer due to his combativeness. Pop was angry for sure but not combative. Then I witnessed the IV nurse insert a 18 gauge catheter into my pops wrist. She never registered IV access and proceeded to deliver 500 cc of solution into the sub-cutaneous space. This was the only vein he had left since they had made the same error the night before in the opposite hand. By 6PM his hand was as large as a soft-ball and this was hours after I complained about her technique.
So the following day Pop got a PICC line. PICC lines are infection risks!

Three days later I took him to the SNF with his PICC line and met with the therapists. Dad was becoming more lucid but I had concerns. I met with the Charge Nurse and facility director to assure his good care. I was concerned about the additional risk for infection from his new PICC line. You see, this facility was part of his life-long $450,000 investment in a continuing care environment; supposedly the best available in Huntsville Alabama. I used to direct clinical services departments in these facilities earlier in my career and was aware of their financial strain as they attempted to deliver hospital level care for 1/3 the cost.
I saw Pop the next day while he was cycling on the recumbent bicycle in the rehabilitation department. He had 20 minutes of therapy to go but as soon as I showed up to watch his work-out the therapist terminated the session and quickly wheeled Pop to his room so we could chat. Dad looked horribly sad, I knelt down to say good-bye kissing him on the forehead I said “I love you Dad!”; he looked up and said “And I love you Jeff”. These were our last words.
Three days later I received a call at 3AM from a person who could not speak English. He mentioned my father’s name and I asked for someone who could speak more clearly. The second person I spoke with also could not speak English. Finally a paramedic picked up the phone…”Mr. Harris, your father is unresponsive and we are taking him to the hospital”.
After a quick dialog I was able to determine that Pop had explosive diarrhea several hours earlier and simply lost consciousness. I called ahead to the Emergency Department to inform them of my father’s forthcoming arrival and that I was worried he might be septic. I told the doctor that Pop was a DNR patient and he should call me when he arrived. When Pop was evaluated the ER Doctor called me with his lab results and it was quite evident that he was dying and most certainly had been allowed to dehydrate while at the Rehabilitation Hospital OOPS I mean Skilled Nursing Facility OOPS I am not sure what I mean. God did I weep as the ER doctor and I discussed his DNR.
I wrestle with the fact that I might have been able to save Pop if I had pushed for re-hydration, antibiotics and other therapy but I couldn’t help think about Pops state of well-being. You see my brother and I had spent years shuffling him around between neurosurgery in Birmingham and other clinical facilities. At one point I had imitated a physician to keep my father from being discharged prematurely after his brain tumor operation. He had been in the hospital for a week. The Medicare Prospective Payment was going to pay for eight days and the hospital was pushing him out to a skilled nursing facility. I watched my Pop eating and realized he had an aspiration problem. Fearful of aspiration pneumonia I asked to have him discharged to the rehabilitation beds at the University Medical Center. I wanted him to receive a speech language therapy evaluation for aspiration risk and rehabilitation services. To get the transfer to rehabilitation where a doctor and therapists would be available; I had to retrieve every clinical skill I had when meeting with the staff to justify his case. When they assumed I was a doctor, I let it ride. Feeling shame the next day I convinced myself that I would do whatever I needed to protect my father.
You know, to make sure he would receive the
Right Care.

As the ACA (Obamacare) was implemented I began to have hope. You see, this year 2017 is the beginning of Medicare’s observation of how well inpatient hospitals and post-acute care facilities integrate. One important measure they are watching is the frequency of readmission to acute care for the same diagnosis. This combined measure of how well institutions, nursing homes, home health networks and primary care communicate regarding a patient’s process as they are handed off between facilities is to prevent patients from becoming ill and requiring re-hospitalization. Trust me folks, it used to be horrible: I can remember turning patients around as they arrived at our rehabilitation hospital and sending them straight back to the Medical Center that had just discharged them. You see, some were still in heart failure and semi-conscious; not only could they not participate in rehabilitation; to attempt rehabilitation might have killed them. But you see, the hospitals were not linked to the rehabilitation and skilled nursing facilities through a common therapeutic goal and reimbursement mechanism. The hospital in Boston just wanted to discharge the patient prior to exceeding their Medicare reimbursement allotment. We however had marketing nurses out in the field accepting any warm body with a heartbeat that just might survive a 21 day Medicare stay in a Skilled Nursing Environment.
My friends had no idea why I never lost my job by reversing the trajectory of these patients. What they did not know was that I had a compassionate family owned corporation employing me who trusted my clinical intuition.
Alas… as of today….Obamacare is being repealed and we have yet to be informed about “TrumpCare”. My guess us that we will return to the past with the exception of mandatory care for persons with pre-existing conditions. Then we will see just how much our policies cost and what our end of year out of pocket expense will be.
For my wife and I,
We are searching once more for our peeps. This week I have looked at my well-being through the end of my life if we ex-patriate to Canada. My cost will be $0.00 for healthcare. My waiting time for a CAT scan will double but Canada’s outcomes for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease and diabetes are slightly better than in the USA. So what do we have to lose? In fact, Canada doesn’t amputate many diabetic limbs. You know why? Because all of their diabetics have access to care!

Fondly thinking of you fellow patients and consumers;
Jeffrey Halbstein-Harris
• An advocate for those who feel lost
• Always watching
• Harnessing the compassion that surrounds you in a time of crisis
• Connecting you with the best science available
• Minding your pocketbook
• Working to return you home safely

Hello Darkness My Old Friend…

I am witnessing an illogical social rage emerge that “if we are not steadfast to our principles of tolerance and acceptance” could ignite into a civil crisis even greater than what I (we) witnessed in the 60s and early 70s.
The content displayed on the Internet is usually present for a single purpose: to sell an idea.
So now we have evidence of dishonesty and amoral behavior.
As I chase material down to its source I find frequently that the information is genuine but stretched beyond its context. Meaning: a video purporting to expose poor security architecture of a 10 year old vote tabulation computer is released from a blog that claims a vast conspiracy to undermine our election process. However, the machine tested was studied through “real scientific procedure” by Stanford years ago and found to be defective, thereby causing the vendor to lose its contracts with election management authority’s .
The video published within the last few days had a single intent: convince the public that we have a crisis in our voting apparatus and a probable conspiracy.
On the same blog the moderator claims our support of foreigners in need is far greater than our effort to support those of us on Social Security. ” How can our Government support thousands of Syrian refugees when it can not give a raise to Soc. Security recipients!”
These words are meant to do nothing but divide us.
On another blog I find the video of a silly man embarrassing himself by making petty comments regarding his power over women. The guy was 59 years old and behaving like an adolescent braggart. Ask me if I care. I think I am intelligent enough to not consider him suitable for public office through listening to his speech alone; let alone some silly dialog he had with a Hollywood “Child” .
Now Most of my friends and I are not content with our choices in this election cycle. However, we know we can survive another 4 years waiting for another leader to emerge if we vote for Sec. Clinton.
But the generation below me: the folks that didn’t experience the Cold War, Vietnam, Students being shot on campus, the pictures in Time of beautiful men hanging from trees by their neck throughout the South. The beginning of and final failure of the war on drugs, Project Apollo.
They can’ t seem to realize that corruption is everywhere but reflected by genuine love and collaborative effort in the very same moment.
The candidates in our election today are simply warning lights on our social dashboard : bringing our attention to our fear of powerlessness, loss of faith in humanity and capacity to understand how each of us is perfectly imperfect. From George Washington to Whoever wins this election ; all of our leaders , all of our heroes have nasty moments along their life-path; They were and are human also.
I think it is time to silence our voices, lay down our pens and video recording devices and sit down for a discussion. Perhaps a discussion that will illuminate our fears, doubts, insecurities, desires, hopes and dreams. Through this work we might once again find our commonalities and work together to re-form our nation.
We are broken…..I think, but not irreparable.

Enjoy

Community Care of North Carolina goes for the gold: Proving valid reduction in hospitalization among Medicaid enrollees with Chronic Disease

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

I have not been posting much lately due to activities with the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative. We are working on an analysis of accreditation standards which will ultimately be used to verify Medical Home processes, procedures and clinical outcomes. Check out their website as you consumer types will have a chance to see what others are doing for you to assure you access to the best in health care as we reform the system over the next few decades.

I am very enthusiastic these days as I am seeing the changes I have hoped for my entire life as person with diabetes since 1966. As a child my doctor was always available to teach how to master my illness and provide tips with mechanisms I could use to reduce my cost: especially when I entered college. My docs have been so cool, I can never adequately thank them. Purchasing a glucometer and testing reagents for me when I was uninsured; providing free laser therapy when my employer dumped the plan I had in favor of becoming self insured. If you want an interesting read see an old post of mine titled Physician heroes.

Today I call your attention to Community Care of NC. The organization that employed me as their clinical informatics lead back in 2002. These folks are using a model of population management and patient care that I had seen work in Massachusetts in the 1990s. To that end my wife and I moved here in 2001 to work for CCNC. They use a centralized partnership between private healthcare industry and public agencies including Medicaid, Public Health, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, the NC Medical Society and the local branch or thee Academy of Family Physicians.

The central teams keep improving patient targeting and clinical outcomes analysis using a variety of statistical sources and deliver regionalized community information from 12 different 501c3 Community Care Networks. The individual Networks then put care coordinators, case managers, pharmacists and administrative staff in place to create local flavors of patient centered care. All have guiding physician committees and other staff who collaborate with subspecialists as well as local hospitals. The net result is a care continuum surrounding the sickest individuals where the team focuses on goals set by the patient, their family and the team. They have been doing this for fifteen years now and I can attest to the fact that they are one of only a few Patient Centered Medical Home Networks in the country that are using a web-native care plan accessible to all on the patient team as well as multiple other physician practice improvement web apps totally focused on education, assessment of each doctors population and measurement of patient outcome.

This week they published the proof in the pudding. After long struggles against threats to defund the program they survived. They are now audited in full and have demonstrated hospital utilization rates falling at 10% per year in the chronic disease population. We are talking HUNDREDS of MILLIONS of DOLLARS in savings folks on top of hugely improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with their sense of well-being.

I have always said that I needed a lot of help in my life. Since I knew how to assemble a care team for myself I figured I may as well help others do the same. Today, in 2015 we have the mechanisms in play to reconnect patients with their physicians. Please step up and teach your docs about your needs, wants and struggles as it will take us a while to walk out of the woods.

nc hospitalization trends under CCNC

Celebrating physicians who stick with patients that are non-compliant due to financial barriers.

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

 

 

 

THERE ARE LIVES IN THE BALANCE

 

This is a synopsis of my attempt to bring affordable timely retina care to impoverished people with diabetes in Eastern NC. I sent this note to the Medicaid Managed Care entity: Community Care of North Carolina and was able to schedule a meeting as a result.

To: The Executive Director of North Carolina Community Care Networks,

“I have three retina ophthalmologists with nine clinics in four counties that are willing to take Medicaid patients. When I retired they asked me what I wanted to do. They had saved my eyesight and I told them that the disparity in services in NC had been my chief frustration since moving here. I said I would like to find as many diabetics as possible who were not compliant with retinal screening or follow-up care due to financial barriers. They agreed to treat as many as I could find after reading my proposal.

Many physicians are dropping Medicaid patients in NC. I have found some excellent, compassionate doctors who want to help.
Will you please help me strategize for an outreach effort. I will do all the work.”

I created a program guide for Medicaid describing access rules and services available. I started with Medicaid because their process outcomes revealed 40%-50% of diabetics missing annual eye exams. Furthermore this was in counties where over 1/3 of the diabetic populations had poor control (A1c > 9%) and therefore were more likely to have disease of the retina.

I met with the Community Care folks who (in my opinion) have a wonderful care coordination and patient centered care model. They informed me that they couldn’t perform specialty referrals as it showed preferential treatment. I responded with:” Many ophthalmologists do not see Medicaid patients and your data point out an underserved chronically ill population. I went on to say that the local hospital charged for a vitrectomy was $12,000 and that my friends would be willing to contract for $3900. They responded with a requirement that I recruit doctors from other practices.

So the retinal surgeons I was working with created a business relationship with an optometry group to perform annual screenings. Since Medicaid had stopped paying for eye exams in non diabetics, many diabetics stopped scheduling their exams as they also thought their services were dropped. However NC Medicaid does cover optometry for persons with diabetes. I guess the messages have not been tested for clarity and understanding in the Medicaid population?

After spending 9 months working with this ophthalmology group to reach out and treat people who are literally going blind due to gaps in care, addressing the needs of the Managed Care Organization (Community Care of North Carolina or CCNC) and following up with additional requests for an audience with their primary care physicians we received no follow through from CCCNC and we have continued to treat diabetics as they trickle in from primary care and emergency room practices with acute retinal hemorrhage and vision loss.

I imagine this is a political issue, as irrational behavior in healthcare systems is usually due to hidden agendas that go unseen in the public. Unseen you say! Yes the pun is intended.

We apologize to the impoverished diabetics of North Carolina, we are here for you, will  always assure you get the best care regardless of your capacity to pay.

If you need help visit this website and schedule an appointment. Taylor Retina Center

These folks saved my vision and I am sure they will save yours if you are able to get to them in time. I hope to have wider support and advertising from agencies trusted with reaching out to help you in the future. For now, no luck with Medicaid CCNC.

The images below illustrate a normal retina and a young 20 y/o diabetic woman with severe diabetic retinopathy as she appeared during her first visit to the clinic’s practice. One must appreciate how much retinal tissue can be lost before the patient notices the change. This is the underlying reason for annual – biannual screenings. When I interviewed the physicians they stated that 20 patients per year appear in their office with this level of injury who are insured by Medicaid or have no insurance at all. They have never denied treatment. Since they own their laser and have ownership in a day surgery center they are also able to address the financial concerns of the operating room provider.

20 year old woman with severe disease                                                Normal Retina

severe retinopathy

A normal retina

 

 

 

 

Hooray Humana for providing useful tools to family caregivers.

Yikes!!

Yikes!!

Lately I have complained about the lack of utility if not barriers created by various e- communication tools that seem to complicate the process of educating consumers on the topics within the domain of self-mastery.
After losing my poa agreement with my father, Humana finally
Let me know that I am now Pop’s designated healthcare proxy.
I find the letter engaging with plenty of contact info content and a promise to send me a care-advocates guidebook with accompanying educational material for visit preparation, medication reconciliation and financial management.
I will let you know how useful it is when received.

For now, a gratuitous thank you to a payer stepping into the medical home care team role with both patient and family!

NC Senate : While the rest of the country profits from North Carolina’s success in Medicaid, you throw the baby out with the bathwater.

 

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

cmis_use

 

 

The graphic report (above right) comes from the CCNC data systems developed by the Community Care of North Carolina Program. It allows communities to identify and assist people in need of support or locate systemic problems such as high utilization rates in local emergency rooms. All of this stuff combined fits into the Medical Home Model that out senate suggests purging CCNC; Yet, as you will note below, this program is a locally managed;public-private joint venture that is used throughout the US to achieve cost reductions in health systems. Please read on:

Yet another testimony to the capability of a Medical Home framework to decrease cost and improve health outcomes was published in today’s NY Times.   Here are the data:

  • The payer: Care First Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • The population size: 1.1 Million!
  • The model: Medical Homes (Community Care of North Carolina an early adopter of this strategy)
  • The savings: $130 Million

The article goes on to explain that results have been mixed in Medical Home Evaluations, demonstrating a need to identify the components that are required to achieve such results.   However, The Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative Chief Executive Marci Neilson noted that the studies are showing promise as Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan demonstrated a $155 Million savings in Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalization through their Medical Home Program last year.   So here’s what I have to say to the Senate: WAKE UP… the people providing the knowledge and structure to the programs now receiving accolades from the media cut their teeth in North Carolina through a fifteen year joint effort between public and private industry. Then, after receiving national recognition they were asked to teach other States the basics of the Medical Home that will reduce cost and improve health outcomes.

  1. Local control with State support
  2. Physician directed care
  3. ACCURATE DATA published frequently, reviewed frequently, converted to focused interventions
  4. Care Coordination and patient education from within the physicians practice
  5. Frequent regional meetings to review success and make adjustments to work-flow and design.

Here is an example from years ago in Greensboro (CCNC ORAL REHYDRATION PROGRAM)  

  • The local Community Care Network discovered that many emergency room admissions were attributed to children experiencing dehydration when they had GI Flu.
  • The CCNC Network (Partnership 4 Health) created an oral rehydration program where they reached out to the community of working mothers who would come home to a child experiencing diarrhea and vomiting.
  • As they engaged the family they taught the mothers to rehydrate their children using pedialyte.
  • They distrusted the rehydration kits to physician practices, public health departments and elsewhere.
  • The people started treating their children at home as opposed to the emergency room.
  • The Medicaid emergency department visit rate for GI distress fell and the tax-payers saved money.
  • All of this with happier children as the most important outcome in my opinion.

So what do you think NC Senate?   How about we keep what works!!! If you need further illustration there are a few thousand of us who would be pleased to teach you: Republicans, Democrats, and Independents alike. 

NC Legislature Let-Down

cmis_use“I thought we were going to keep what worked?”

The NC General Assembly, as an independent move regardless of feedback from their electorate, physicians, Medicaid program evaluation programs is moving forward with plans to throw the baby out with the bath water. www.NC Health News May 30, 2014.

It is a sad moment indeed to see the citizens of NC exploited by their General Assembly. As a person who has had diabetes for 47 of 57 years. As a person who spent 15 years traveling the US assisting “the hired guns of the assembly” win bids for population care management under capitation I can attest to the trickery in numbers, computer vapor-ware and conveniently forgotten success of in-place efforts between 1990 and now.

The GA will find data to back their claims of NC Medicaid efforts failure to improve quality and decrease cost. When I attended the Medicaid reform meeting in Raleigh, I sat next to a former legislator who was also an MD. The NC Budget office had just finished describing that NC Medicaid’s claimed savings was a result of unfair comparison to other States with a different % of children in the program. I informed the man that the approach used was inaccurate and that the Office of Rural Health had gone to the extremes of analyzing differences in utilization between the States CCNC Medical Home program and Fee for Service basic Medicaid. These extremes included using well-recognized illness burden modeling tools that are commonly used by the best healthcare economists in the US. There has never been any doubt that the program in place through CCNC was effective.

My wife and I moved here in 2001 after the sales of our company to a commercial insurance disease management vendor. The vendor “Active Health Management” then sold itself to Aetna. Aetna insures over 20 million individuals. I had read about the pioneering efforts of Mr. James Bernstein’s Community Care of NC program (then called Access 2 now called CCNC): A program which challenges each region to self-determine areas needing improvement in healthcare processes by carefully examining their own data. Then the CCNC program aligns State DHHS resources with local providers to work together to accomplish documented goals as guided by industry standard project plans. I moved here to work with CCNC as the opportunity to learn from the best and take part in the reform we need was enticing. These were the people that had been trained in the Nation’s best public health graduate education programs. Many of the from our own UNC.

NC was one of a few States that knew of the few simple aspects of care necessary to reduce the rate of inflation in health spending. While the rest of the country was wasting money on Disease Management Programs sold by private industry CCNC and DMA had the foresight to understand that you can only make these improvements through local partnership. The basis of change is multi-pronged including these objectives: 1) Patients receive incentive to contact their primary care docs before going to an emergency room, 2) care managers to assist the 20% of the population spending 80% of the resources choose the correct care and engage in self – management and the creation of patient centered care plans that addresses all barriers to health including transportation issues to and from medical appointments and compliance with medication use for chronic conditions.

These are the things that the most respected professionals in the USA teach states that need help. Funny that some of NCs current Medicaid CCNC leadership are invited to other states to educate their legislature on how to reform Medicaid to demonstrate methods to a) find, engage and treat the highest cost, sickest people in the insurance pool; b) engage patients in managing their own illness as Greensboro did when it taught mothers how to hydrate their children instead of visiting the ER and c) reduce the threat to the States economy.

All of this published by the National Institute for Health Improvement Triple Aim measures to improve our Nations Health, our satisfaction with the system in general and lower the cost per person/year.

So here you are NC, years of recognized success; national awards for design; a web-native care coordination platform which allows any professional to view the patients history of treatment, list of problems and medications along with the published, evidenced based goals that the patient and treating team are working toward; a physician portal allowing physicians to review their improvement success and areas where they can tighten up their practice; a portal allowing physicians to contrast their performance against their peers setting the stage for friendly competition: Virtually all of the tools that the supposed consultants will tell the legislature they need.

The IT infrastructure for N3CN’s data center which houses the web-applications noted above along with the support staff to address the needs of 14 networks caring for over 1 million North Carolina citizens has over 300 simultaneous users including case managers and physicians and meets HIPAA security standards. It allows the professional to access critical information in a time of acute need; something the States hospitals are just now implementing and still have not agreed to share information on the NCHIE. It was designed and implemented for a fraction of the cost of commercial systems using a public-private partnership model. Does anyone know about this?

So, we have a nationally recognized program, we have nationally recognized population health management information system architecture, we have healthier diabetics and asthmatics and those of us who worked in the system that actually know something about medicine and being a patient are asked to be panel speakers in regional US conferences on Patient Centered Care somehow get discounted by a General Assembly without the skills to understand the nature of the problem. I know this since the person sitting next to me in the Medicaid open forum told me “we do not understand the data” when I asked him if he needed some help to tease out fact from fiction.

The N3CN organization is positioned with others to take accountability for the population that the assembly is concerned about. Functioning as ACO for multiple commuted local networks is a dreamlike structure that many states would pay millions to introduce. You see, we not only have the knowledge and technology, we have the countless life years of experience in our native state: but instead, the GA wants to hire nurses to call me from California to discuss my diabetes management issues and send me a nice refrigerator magnet and new web-site to track my health. Unfortunately it wont talk to my Duke, UNC, Federal Blue Button website when I start Medicare this year.

Wow!!!!!!!!!