Untangled Health

Consumers Unite To Drive The Changes We Need

Tag: Healthcare Debate

A Diabetic in Puerto Rico calls out for insulin : Shame on us…

Normal Retina                                                        Severe Diabetic Retinopathy

 


 

I am angry.

Listening to a diabetic in Puerto Rico plead for an insulin delivery this week brought back remembrance of the body pain, insatiable thirst and intractable nausea I experienced when I was broke in 1974 and had to borrow money for medication as I hitch hiked to California to live with my brother Bruce. Feeling helpless I received a $75.00 wire transfer in the nick of time. Fortunately I had a loving brother and Western Express. Thank G-d for a wonderful primary care Doc that taught me to reverse DKA on my own when I was only 13 years old. I can’t describe the misery of Diabetic ketoacidosis with sufficient magnitude. Imagine dying of thirst.

I do not understand where our Army is. It seems we have infinite resources to drop special forces into any part of the world where there is a threat to The American Way. Yet in the time of Trump, and in the Time if Bush I heard the call of The Great Oz.. “We are doing a fabulous job”  or  “Great job Brownie”. Here lies evidence of my claim that we are own our own in this great country: The Country that used to promise opportunity and someone to watch over us when we fall upon hard times. Go ahead, call me a snow-flake…Then walk a mike in my shoes and tell me again “to suck it up”.

Today I am ashamed of the indifferent , arrogant attitude of Donald J Trump and want our Global Friends to know that we know how to care for our own, we have the resources to care for our own and that the Real America is currently on the mat in a twelve round championship fight against Master Blaster. Let me be clear; Master Blaster doesn’t run this part of town!

The retinal photo above right is an actual photo of a person with diabetes who has not had access to primary care. She lived in a rural area of North Carolina, had no insurance and died one year after this photo was taken. She was in her thirties. Medication, a treatment plan and adequate nutrition go a long way.

Hey DJT, stop worrying about what people think of you and send some helicopters in with the supplies that are piled up a few miles of the shores of Puerto Rico.

Awe Nuts! I am really pissed.

21st Century Cures Act Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement Kick-Off Meeting

Listening to a Webinar produced by the ONC (Office of National Coordinator for HIT) today I was content to hear about the progress of SHIEC (Strategic Health Information Exchange Collaborative) and NATE  (National Association for Trusted Exchange) during the morning review of National Trust Frameworks and Network-to-Network Connectivity.

It is clear that consumer need is receiving attention: We are far behind the curve wherein we have vocalized our frustration with barriers to accessing our  personal health information  and the industry is listening.

Keep in mind that you are the “master of your destiny”  and “captain of your ship” when it comes to assuring you receive the Right Care, from the Right People in the Right Place at the Right Time. Self-knowledge and System-Knowledge are your keys to success.

Best summarized by Cynthia Fisher the founding angel of ViaCord at the end of the morning session: “Patients are bound to institutions that have the keys to their data and are expected to write a blank check for services with no visibility of cost”. Passionately reflecting on the plentiful gaps in the information used to make critical health care decisions during our encounters with providers throughout the healthcare system, she said; “Healthcare Data is like a Liquid Asset; it needs to flow!”

Keep your eye on the target friends: The day when you are trusted to exercise your right to control both ownership and flow of the information that your life depends on!

Jeffrey

ONC Patient’s and Families 

An advocate gets busy while every politician and “talking head” takes credit for healthcare model ideas published long ago.

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

I watched Barbara Starfield again last night. She passed away in 2011 but it seamed as though she was sitting in my living room telling me everything will be alright but many of us will never get our way. Barbara spent several decades studying the characteristics of health systems all over the world. Her final conclusions were simple and easy to implement as long as social agreements were made between consumers of healthcare services and their providers. The contract (sort of) is that my primary care doctor will be available when needed if I promise to contact his or her office before going to the ER for an earache or other non-emergent condition; my doctor also agrees to follow my care as I transition through life stages and address all mental and physical health conditions as they arise by assuring I connect with the correct specialist if required. The specialists in return are in constant contact with my primary care doctor so the primary care clinic is coordinating continuous and comprehensive care and reviewing all interactions between myself and other medical environments. Like I said earlier this week. Someone to watch over me. I first learned of Dr. Starfield in 2001 and followed her publications. Funny, she was never accepted to sit on any best-practice boards but the scientific community considered her work to be spectacular in terms of statistical approach and quality. In other words, she looked for the null hypothesis also.

Again…concerns over repeal and replace.

Some more diatribe with hope at sarcastic humor is written for you below. Please follow through to the end as I pasted a really cool graphic pointing you to a new society of consumers and professionals that might fix the system over the long run.

The conversation doesn’t stop at my dinner table, on my phone, through IM or Facebook. It seems as though my popularity index took a healthy bump after November 8th, 2016. I wish I could be happy about the reasons for the traffic.
“Jeff, you are on Medicare are you concerned?”

Well yes; you see, as we become older the likelihood of needing assistance from case managers, specialists, short stays in skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities increases. Same with home health services which is always the preferred place to recover from the self-inflicted fractured hip that occurred while my masculine ego informed me of my capacity to clean out my gutters.
One of the most important changes to the clinical language coming from Obamacare is the right for all patients cared for by primary care doctors with Medicare contracts to receive “Coordinated, Comprehensive Care”. Lately you might have heard the terms: “Patient Centered Care” or “Medical Home”. You probably heard President Elect Trump mention “Patient Centered” or a new commercial by Humana presented by a handsome young doctor stating that Humana’s system of Patient Centered Care is superior because of their capacity to coordinate your care within their “medical community”. Then you will watch a local conservative pundit state: “those stupid narrow networks tried through Obamacare didn’t work: here is a toast to repeal and replace.
This stuff cracks me up for the same proponents of patient centered care realize that closely collaborating narrow networks can provide you with clinical personnel that understand your needs better than anyone else! In fact, they have the same attributes of a Patient Centered Care Team using a single medical record and plan of care to increase safety and minimize mistakes. Yet you will hear no one (perhaps save me and a few of us that are tired of scraping the poop off our boots) tell you that the words Patient Centered, Narrow Network, Accountable Outcomes, Value Added Payment, Medical Homes, and all other terms implying a tightly coordinated, error free clinical team surrounding all patients are not original concepts. In fact, they are in place in many of our successful neighbor nations who provide universal enrollment and have always demonstrated lower reliance on emergency room services for basic medicine, better health outcomes and no difference in treatment effectiveness for cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other leading causes of premature mortality. Our own CMS (The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) have published the policy here July 2016:
So all of a sudden the administration of 2017 will be using terminology invented by others to describe care models that work after years of academic surveillance by healthcare policy analysists and already written into The Patient Protection Affordable Care Act or what the opponents call “Obama-Care”.
My prediction is we will keep the new payment systems for coordinated care and chronic disease care management. However, the credit for the success will fall under a new Trump label. My fears is that the same three insurance companies comprising the oligopoly of payers for American Healthcare will recoup their lost profits of mandated care without premium inflation for the chronically ill by shifting the premiums higher for those with pre-existing conditions. So here is another question from the week:
“Jeff, what will I do now I couldn’t get covered because of my history of cancer before the ACA?” “What if “Trump-care” requires coverage for pre-existing illnesses but allows insurance companies to include the illness in the premium pricing model? “ My response to this question was “not sure, my cost in the NC High Risk Insurance Pool for my diabetes prior to Obamacare was $1200.00 per month not including co-pays. Today it is $350.00.
More on Patient Centered Care AKA Medical Homes AKA Integrated Care AKA Chronic Illness Care.
I discussed the integrated care model and its payment adjustments to my Men’s group on Thursday night as they requested a primer on planning for their last ten years of life. Their hope was that our system of care had evolved and they would not have to lose their homes to cover the long-term care charges. Many of the guys in my group neglected to buy long term care insurance when they were young and healthy, had since suffered a chronic disease diagnosis and episode of treatment and no longer qualified for long term care insurance. They could however place $10 K per month into an account to pre-pay up to one year of long term care. This is what my father did: In 2006 he entered into a contract with a transitional care organization. He paid them $350,000 for full access to assisted living and long term care until his death. They also allowed him to live in the attached apartment complex for independent seniors for an additional rent of $3200 per month including one meal per day. Not a bad deal eh? Oh yeah…one more oversight: My friends ; all retired upper middle class professionals had no idea that Medicare didn’t pay for long term custodial care either in home or inpatient facility.
Now, like I said the other day, I am a bit tired of shouting the truth to those who were unfortunate enough to buy into the following promise: “Oh we will have the most wonderful healthcare system in the world” and “We promise to repeal the expensive policies and replace with something better.
We were on our way folks: The biggest mistake, President Obama’s team was denied the necessary Medicaid expansion for ALL not SOME States by our supreme courts. If you don’t understand the math I will be pleased to describe it in another column. Basically when the folks that would have had access to Medicaid don’t receive the insurance they still consume services. The loss of revenue winds up on the balance sheets of hospitals and providers and they respond by increasing their cost per service. The insurance companies pay more and your premiums increase. So… my neighbors policy (55 year old male) in NC costs $11,000 per year. The very same policy in New Hampshire where they expanded Medicaid costs $5,500 per year. As Mr. Obama leaves keep in mind that the rate of increase in health costs since the inception of Obama Care is the lowest it has been in 40 years.
Somehow, someway; we need to cover everybody. If we do not we cannot cover the losses incurred in the private sector without the Magical Thinking that has been sold you for so many decade. Hide the losses, get others to pay for the losses through modest increases in cost of living and blame the doctors, and hospitals who give away more free care than you could ever imagine.
What would happen if our incredible consumer driven internet harnessed the decision support technology that we use daily on Amazon and instantly brings the right service to you when needed should you or a loved one become ill? What if we harnessed IBM Watson to make the diagnosis thereby reducing error rates and reducing unnecessary utilization of expensive diagnostic procedures?
What if we didn’t need insurance companies any more to assess population risk and perform preauthorization services while we waited for our new medication?
Since we have all of the data connecting lifestyle, culture, nutrition, infection and the human genome can anyone appreciate where we are headed with our capacity to discover the cause of disease and effect of treatment? This is not decades from now my friends; it is within the reach of our children’s lifetime. I have wonderful friends with incredible scientific minds that are creating open source technologies to accomplish human collaboration like humankind has never witnessed. The only barrier to their success is a loss of priority to cure disease, increase well-being and expand the functional-years of human life.
Or…we can keep these technologies secret, forget those we have developed through the natural sequestration of competing private enterprise and traditional silo thinking. If this is where we are headed then the best investment to assure a painless end of life if you are not surrounded by humanitarian friends is my undying support for the second amendment. If you catch my drift.

Check out Right Care Folks!

Right Care Now

Right Care Now

Community Care of North Carolina goes for the gold: Proving valid reduction in hospitalization among Medicaid enrollees with Chronic Disease

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

I have not been posting much lately due to activities with the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative. We are working on an analysis of accreditation standards which will ultimately be used to verify Medical Home processes, procedures and clinical outcomes. Check out their website as you consumer types will have a chance to see what others are doing for you to assure you access to the best in health care as we reform the system over the next few decades.

I am very enthusiastic these days as I am seeing the changes I have hoped for my entire life as person with diabetes since 1966. As a child my doctor was always available to teach how to master my illness and provide tips with mechanisms I could use to reduce my cost: especially when I entered college. My docs have been so cool, I can never adequately thank them. Purchasing a glucometer and testing reagents for me when I was uninsured; providing free laser therapy when my employer dumped the plan I had in favor of becoming self insured. If you want an interesting read see an old post of mine titled Physician heroes.

Today I call your attention to Community Care of NC. The organization that employed me as their clinical informatics lead back in 2002. These folks are using a model of population management and patient care that I had seen work in Massachusetts in the 1990s. To that end my wife and I moved here in 2001 to work for CCNC. They use a centralized partnership between private healthcare industry and public agencies including Medicaid, Public Health, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, the NC Medical Society and the local branch or thee Academy of Family Physicians.

The central teams keep improving patient targeting and clinical outcomes analysis using a variety of statistical sources and deliver regionalized community information from 12 different 501c3 Community Care Networks. The individual Networks then put care coordinators, case managers, pharmacists and administrative staff in place to create local flavors of patient centered care. All have guiding physician committees and other staff who collaborate with subspecialists as well as local hospitals. The net result is a care continuum surrounding the sickest individuals where the team focuses on goals set by the patient, their family and the team. They have been doing this for fifteen years now and I can attest to the fact that they are one of only a few Patient Centered Medical Home Networks in the country that are using a web-native care plan accessible to all on the patient team as well as multiple other physician practice improvement web apps totally focused on education, assessment of each doctors population and measurement of patient outcome.

This week they published the proof in the pudding. After long struggles against threats to defund the program they survived. They are now audited in full and have demonstrated hospital utilization rates falling at 10% per year in the chronic disease population. We are talking HUNDREDS of MILLIONS of DOLLARS in savings folks on top of hugely improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with their sense of well-being.

I have always said that I needed a lot of help in my life. Since I knew how to assemble a care team for myself I figured I may as well help others do the same. Today, in 2015 we have the mechanisms in play to reconnect patients with their physicians. Please step up and teach your docs about your needs, wants and struggles as it will take us a while to walk out of the woods.

nc hospitalization trends under CCNC

NC Continues to brainwash its citizens

 

We are dropped from the universe into loving hands (unfortunately not for all though)

We are dropped from the universe into loving hands (unfortunately not for all though)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a recent opinion from Brian Balfour of Raleigh’s Civitas Institute. My response follows.

From Raleigh News and Observer Saturday December 28, 2014

Last week, yet another study claiming that expanding Medicaid in North Carolina would create tens of thousands of jobs was released and dutifully reported by the media. The findings of such studies, however, are based upon a fatally flawed assumption that Medicaid coverage equates to access to medical care.

The latest report, produced by George Washington University researchers, declares that North Carolina will miss out on 43,000 jobs in the next five years, along with $21 billion in federal money, if it continues to refuse Medicaid expansion as prescribed in Obamacare. The study’s findings largely echo other recent reports, such as a January study produced by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine that came to similar conclusions.

The job growth claims are based on the state’s “drawing down” additional federal funds due to Medicaid expansion. As the GWU report describes, “Since most of the cost of a Medicaid expansion would be borne by the federal government, expansion would result in billions of dollars in additional federal funding flowing into North Carolina. These funds will initially be paid to health care providers, such as hospitals, clinics or pharmacies, as health care payments for Medicaid services.”

This income received by health care providers is then spent on suppliers (such as medicine, medical supplies) and in their community on goods and services such as groceries, clothes and movies.

The fatal flaw in this methodology, however, is that in order to “draw down” federal Medicaid dollars, actual medical services need to be provided to Medicaid patients. It is only when doctors actually treat Medicaid patients that the federal government pays those providers for the services.

 

For instance, the NCIOM study assumes that more than 500,000 North Carolinians will not only enroll in Medicaid under expansion, but each would receive on average roughly $4,300 in medical services each year. As these services are rendered, the doctors and hospitals are paid by the federal Medicaid program, which injects the money into the state’s economy and spurs the job creation, according to the studies.

But here’s where the studies’ jobs claims fall apart: North Carolina already suffers from a shortage of doctors.

According to federal guidelines, 78 counties in North Carolina qualify as Health Professional Shortage Areas because of shortages of primary medical care doctors. And the problem is getting worse. According to the Shep’s Center for Health Services Research at UNC-Chapel Hill, North Carolina’s supply of primary care physicians is dwindling, dropping from 9.4 per 10,000 people in 2010 to 7.9 doctors per 10,000 people in 2011.

Indeed, a 2011 survey by the Association of American Medical Colleges found that only 15 states have fewer primary care physicians per capita than North Carolina. The doctor shortage is especially pronounced in the state’s rural areas, where there is a greater concentration of Medicaid enrollees as a share of the population.

And more to the point, not only is there a general doctor shortage in North Carolina, there is a shortage of doctors accepting Medicaid patients.

Medicaid roles in North Carolina have ballooned from about 1 million in 2003 to roughly 1.7 million today. Adding another 500,000 would push the program over 2 million enrollees and mark more than a million new Medicaid patients in a dozen years.

All this would take place when the number of physicians accepting Medicaid patients is dwindling.

Imagine adding since 2003 the equivalent of the entire population of Wake County to a group of people fighting over a shrinking pool of doctors. Making matters worse, a 2012 article in Health Affairs found that one-fourth of North Carolina’s physicians will not take any new Medicaid patients.

In short, there simply is not nearly enough doctors to meet the demand, and things could get worse.

As reported recently by WRAL, “A survey this year by The Physicians Foundation found that 81 percent of doctors describe themselves as either over-extended or at full capacity, and 44 percent said they planned to cut back on the number of patients they see, retire, work part-time or close their practice to new patients.”

Such extreme supply constraints tells us that if North Carolina were to expand Medicaid, the newly enrolled would have great difficulty actually seeing a doctor. Coverage will not equal access.

If new enrollees in the already overcrowded Medicaid program don’t have access to care, then there won’t be any services provided. With no services provided, no federal dollars are “drawn down” to Medicaid providers. The whole premise behind the studies purporting to show job creation is unsupportable.

Brian Balfour is policy director of the Civitas Institute in Raleigh.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/12/26/4427841/why-medicaid-expansion-wont-boost.html?sp=/99/108/#storylink=cpy

 

 

Untangled Health’s Response

Jeffrey Harris · Consultant Community Medical Home Implementation: PCPCC Co-Chair e-Health Group; Director Diabetes Eyesight Preservation Program Taylor Retina Center
I am writing In response to Brian Balfour’ opinion on the relationship between expanding Medicaid in NC and job growth on Saturday December 28, 2014.

The man standing next to me in Church in Four Oaks NC in 2011 said; “you must have sugar”; as he observed me checking my blood with a finger stick. “Sure do brother I said, since the age of 10, this is my 44th year with diabetes, I assume you have the disease also.” “Sure do, runs in my family: I am scheduled to have several toes amputated next week.” I could not help but notice the soft cast and bandage on his leg and told him I was sorry that he had to be the victim of such an avoidable circumstance. “Avoidable?” he said; this happens to everyone in my family; we all assume it is par for the course.”
These are the people who would receive coverage under Medicaid expansion should NC decide to follow the recommendation of the Federal Government under the Affordable Care Act. In fact, more than 400,000 of these people who are presently uninsured would have a source of payment for Medical Care. I know them well as I was one and if not for the generosity of friends would have gone without insulin on several occasions in my life.
On Saturday, Brian Balfour, policy director of the Civitas Institute in Raleigh demonstrated a common misunderstanding of health economics. He states NC will not expand Jobs through accepting Federal Medicaid expansion money because we historically have underserved areas with few physicians who cannot expand their caseloads. I guess this means that in a free market society if a geographical area in need of services receives funding and resources to increase their supply of services that the suppliers of such services (Community Clinics, Medical Schools) will not increase the capacity of the delivery system?
Mr. Balfour further fails to recognize that these patients are already receiving treatment often for free in local emergency departments, further inflating the cost of healthcare to the insured.
By the way, Mr. Balfour fails to recognize that North Carolina wrote the book on how to provide Medicaid coordinated care through a Primary Care Medical home which has served as the ‘how-to’ guide for numerous other states (Community Care of NC).
Let’s see: Where Mr. Balfour is correct with regard to our need to expand the number of primary care physicians we have multiple mechanisms in place through ACA that are making the profession of primary care medicine much more attractive. I point the reader to one of many publications demonstrating the return on investment for engaging individuals in patient centered primary care Profiles in interprofessional health training. Since President Bush called for the adoption of electronic health record technology we are now well passed the early adopter stage of connected information systems that allow us to find large segments of our population that require access to specialty care thereby prospectively catching the crisis before it occurs and saving all stakeholders time and money; but more importantly mitigating the risk for the permanent suffering that arises from poorly managed chronic disease. Telemedicine is now a recognized intervention and carries a reasonable fee for patients and doctors to feel as though they receive a fair exchange in value (wellness for the patient and salary’s for the doctor’s practice). One thing any student of economics learns is that investments in technology and advancements in process favor a positive shift in the supply demand curve and its derivative…productivity. Let me recap: New tech, new care coordinating jobs, new analysts’ jobs = MORE JOBS!
In my work I spend a great deal of time assisting the public with the interpretation of so-called facts and opinions arising through think-tanks and praised by the media. I am confident in my judgment that NC Medicaid should expand in accordance with ACA policy. So are the Vice President of the IBM Global Health Initiative, our Governor and every other well versed healthcare economist regardless of political party affiliation. I suggest you do some of your own reading (reports vs opinions like mine). Good luck to my 400000 friends that are deprived of fair health care services when they are ill.
One more thing:
Physicians are willing to treat Medicaid patients. I spend my time looking for specialty care. And have located retina surgeons willing to treat diabetics regardless of funding: Simply to preserve eyesight.
Jeffrey Harris
Consulting Program Manager Taylor Retinal Center
Co-Chair Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative Washington DC

Hooray Humana for providing useful tools to family caregivers.

Yikes!!

Yikes!!

Lately I have complained about the lack of utility if not barriers created by various e- communication tools that seem to complicate the process of educating consumers on the topics within the domain of self-mastery.
After losing my poa agreement with my father, Humana finally
Let me know that I am now Pop’s designated healthcare proxy.
I find the letter engaging with plenty of contact info content and a promise to send me a care-advocates guidebook with accompanying educational material for visit preparation, medication reconciliation and financial management.
I will let you know how useful it is when received.

For now, a gratuitous thank you to a payer stepping into the medical home care team role with both patient and family!

A Chronic Disease Patient Reports On e-HR and p-HR utility

 

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

I will be attending the PCPCC annual conference next week and moderating a session on Do It Yourself Primary Care Medical Homes.

Most of my time of late has been attending to my ‘case’ as the demands of self-management are now more complex with the advent of new tools which were to lighten our load. Nowadays I spend at lease two hours each week keeping my 4 p-HRs up to date across four specialty physicians.

Why you ask? Well it appears that someone forgot to turn on the ‘interoperability switch’. I am sure it is here somewhere, I just can’t find it. I know the standards were written for certification purposes, I even have a copy of them. For some reason, here in metropolitan RTP North Carolina: Duke, Wake Med and UNC have all established contracts with Epic. The physicians that I use are independent and they have all chosen AllSCRIPTS and this is my patient experience.

NOTHING CONNECTS

I HAVE AN EPIC MY CHART PORTAL AT UNC

I HAVE ANOTHER EPIC MYCHART PORTAL AT DUKE

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS-MEDFUSION PORTAl AT GARNER INTERNAL MEDICINE

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS MEDFUSION PORTAL AT SOUTHERN DERMATOLOGY

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS PORTAL WITH NO MED FUSION AT NC CARDIOLOGY

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS PORTAL WITH NO MED FUSION AT MY ENDOCRINOLOGIST

I HAVE A HEALTHVAULT PORTAL ATTACHED TO LABCORP AND SURESCRIPTS

 I AM UNABLE TO TRANSFER CCR S BETWEEN RECORDS

THE FACILITIES ARE NOT TRANSFERRING THE RECORDS

OUR TAXPAYERS SUPPOSEDLY BUILT THE NCHIE TO CONNECT TO ALL PROVIDERS

I started out on this journey to reduce errors in medicine in 1997. Why are we still here? Please don’t blame it on Obama, Bush, Clinton; well you get the picture.

Here is my ‘secure message’ to my Medical Home

My recent note to my PCMH

My recent note to my PCMH

 

Not an insurance company, just an empowered consumer.

Hopeful

Hopeful

My report for today:

Helped one more person register his family for an affordable insurance product using Healthcare.gov

Sequence

Met friend at 4:00 for dinner prior to our club meeting. Turn’s out he is lost in acronyms and asked for help.

Over the course of the next four hours we improved his ability to self-advocate, submitted an application and lessened his anger and fear of OBAMACARE.

My objective was met by my friends eloquent ability to inform his teacher of the many reasons OBAMACARE should have never been named OBAMACARE and his understanding of healthcare as it differed from earlier in the day when he could only think of it as “the monthly premium “or the cost of a subspecialists co-pay”; or “a communist scam”.

We ended the night with one happy conservative family man receiving a quote for his silver policy for a family of three. The monthly premium is $200 less than last years and his services have increased.

As we concluded the evening he asked if I ever thought of inventing a software program that would track all important health information for patients.  He had evidently been responsible for a $4000 co-pay on an $18,000 ER visit for chest-pain. This was mostly due to his inability to articulate a thorough history to the doctors on staff.

I described to him the importance of maintaining a relationship with a primary care physician and then logged on to MyHealthRecord at Duke and MS Health-Vault to demonstrate the rather rough but much better communication I had with my physicians and interoperability of pharmacy and EMR systems. Then I described how these data could be used to empower a person in an emergency with timely and acurate information. His conclusion: Jeesh, I probably would not have needed the expensive work-up if the doctors had access to all these studies!

One more convert.

So little time….

But one more convert.

Tomorrow’s agenda: Meet with ophthalmology practice to organize diabetic eyesight preservation program for non-Medicaid, uninsured folks in NC. So far, I have the cost of a vitrectomy reduced from $12000 at a local hospital to $4800. Not bad for a days work!

Jeff Harris

Not an insurance company, just an empowered consumer.

Provider and patient feedback 10/01/2013: and a diabetic finds his laser treatment.

Hopeful

True story:
Man with diabetic retinopathy
September 30, 2013 No health insurance
October 1, 2013 Accepted by NC Blue Cross for $284 per month
I am ecstatic!
I received a call yesterday: A report from an ophthalmologist friend who I am assisting to develop a diabetes eyesight preservation program: “Jeff, we are so excited; our patient y has insurance! Last year we performed his treatment for free. Now, after January 1st we will be able to charge for his laser surgery.”
“Great!” I said; “imagine how many sight years will be gained, now we just need to find them, get then enrolled and treated!”
By the way, this doctor is a dear friend; one of the guys; he and his partners have never denied service to a patient based on their ability to pay. He is slowing down now at age 67, brought on two new partners that are young, accepting of his philosophy and simply thrilled to be practicing their art. There is enough left to earn what they consider a good living and now expand their practice to those patients who have been afraid to approach the office ask for a favor.
This is the first good news I have written about in two years. I hope to continue with this trend!

 

 

 

Patient Care Alert! Don’t accept free self monitoring supplies through telephone solicitation without involving your physician.

IMAG0110Patient Centered Care requires patients and families to assume an active role in their health management.Recently, I have fallen victim to daily calls from “National Diabetes Supply Experts” offering free testing equipment. If I accepted  each offer I would need to change supply brands through requesting a new prescription from my Medical Home. This process happens thousands of times per week without the inclusion of the physician and patient in a discussion regarding the benefit of supply change. Your data, including diagnostic information (for me Diabetes) is being leaked, purchased or stolen. I have now filed a case for data breach through the OCR mechanism.

Your decisions matter: Not just for you, but for the Nation as a whole.

The priorities of Health Reform include improving access to services, medicines and supplies to all who are in need. One special population: Those with chronic illness; require recurrent refills for home monitoring and therapeutic supplies. For example: As a diabetic I require home glucose monitoring supplies and much more. The photo above shows my kitchen table while preparing for a business trip. You will observe that I have an insulin pump, a continuous glucose monitoring instrument, the associated catheters and an impressive array of prescription medications.

The cost of supplies to me personally exceed $5000 per year in addition to my current $800 per month insurance premium. The cost of my supplies to my insurance company also exceed $8,000 per year over the past two decades.

Now! Another purpose EQUALLY IMPORTANT of the Affordable Care Act is to make health care AFFORDABLE!

Because we decided to maintain a multiple payer system we continue to have a dichotomy between public and private funding sources e.g. Medicare and Blue Cross. As a result many entities are competing for your business as a healthcare product consumer.

Where we have free market, we have human entrepreneurial ingenuity. As I have said in the past, folks like me have always managed to figure out a way to maintain our cash flow during times of legislative change. So, lately: through the lens of a patient and former healthcare entrepreneur I have witnessed the following behavior:

Somewhere, somehow a bunch of mail order diabetes supply services have been calling my home. Over the past three weeks, the calls occurred daily from three different telephone numbers. Each call represented a different company and each agent had the same script:

“Hello Mr. Harris; I represent “Acme Diabetes Excellence” we have been chosen by your insurance company to provide you with a new technology for blood sugar monitoring. I need to collect some basic information to fulfill this order and your free supplies will be mailed shortly.”

No agent has been able to inform me of how they obtained my protected health information and not one agent has allowed me to speak with their supervisor. I have filed a HIPAA data breach complaint with the Office of Civil Rights but suspect nothing will happen.

Most insured diabetics today have multiple blood sugar monitors that have been given to them by their physicians, drug stores and other vendors to try the technology and conclude which device has the most appropriate for their life style. The meters are free because the profit is in the resale of test-strips which have retail prices between $10.00 and $50.00 per package of 50. Each b.rand will only work when coupled to the monitor given away through such wonderful corporate generosity!!

What these companies are doing is taking advantage of some database products that have evidently become available. I find this infuriating as the intrusion on my self-care plan which is negotiated between my medical home personnel, my insurance company and myself will serve no purpose other than inflating individual and aggregate healthcare costs. THIS IS A PROBLEM! IT CAN UNDERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE ACA AND I AM ASKING FEDERAL CONSUMER PROTECTION AGENCIES TO RESEARCH THE ISSUE.

I support free market economies. However I suggest human behavior arising from free-market opportunity might be the largest determinant of uncontrolled health care cost escalation.

So, as we work toward building a comprehensive, coordinated team approach to chronic disease, let’s not forget the impact of our decisions when we select self-care technologies.