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What is at risk if Obamacare is Rescinded

Reconciling data in my six health portals

What is at risk for all subscriber to commercial insurance programs if Obamacare is Rescinded?

This analysis with specific allegorical references was posted by my friend Wendy today. I find it accurate and far beyond my skills to interpret and describe What is at risk for EVERY-BODY

Obama Care is. . . The ACA (Affordable Care Act)
Last night as his first order of business the new president signed an executive order to repeal the ACA. Here’s what this means… even if you are safely covered behind employer-provided insurance, the protections set forth in the ACA (Affordable Care Act), apply to you too. And if those protections are repealed along with the rest (or any part) of the program, you will also be affected.
That means you may be trapped in a job, because your pre-existing condition may mean you will not qualify for new insurance offered by another employer, and the cost of private insurance would be prohibitive. If your employer shuts down, lays you off, or even changes insurers, well, you are out of luck. The Senate GOP voted this week that they would not require an eventual ACA replacement to protect against discrimination for pre-existing conditions, which was the standard before the ACA.
It means that you (a young adult under the age of 26) or your adult children (over 18) may find yourselves without the protection of insurance, as the Senate GOP voted last night that an eventual ACA replacement will not be required to allow young people to remain on their parents’ insurance up to the age of 26.
It means that if you have a high-risk pregnancy, or life-threatening illness such as cancer, you may not be able to afford all the care you need, because you may hit lifetime or annual caps. If you have an infant born with any kind of severe medical condition, or premature, they may hit their lifetime insurance cap before they are old enough to walk. The Senate GOP voted last night that an eventual ACA replacement program would not be required to prohibit lifetime insurance caps.
It means that if you are a struggling parent who is uninsured or under-insured, you will no longer be able to count on at least your kids getting the routine medical and dental care they need under the Children’s Health Insurance Plan (CHIP). The Senate GOP voted that CHIP is not required to be protected by an eventual ACA replacement.
These provisions of the ACA affect everyone in this country, not just those without insurance through their employers.
If you are not okay with these changes, call your representatives and let them know what’s important to you. Nothing has been set in stone yet, but our legislators have shown us a map of what they plan to do if constituents don’t make their voices heard loud and clear.
Hold down here to copy, paste, and post (do not share) on your timeline, if you feel this information needs to be passed on.

This is a comment from NORA on FaceBook
As a person with R.A. (pre-existing condition) Before ACA I was never able to purchase even basic insurance for under $1500 a month and thus went without insurance from the time I graduated University until I was 49 years old. It’s $2000 per visit to a Rheumatologist, so I only went once a year and could not afford medications. I lived with daily debilitating pain and exhaustion among other things. If you know somebody with RA you know is serious. ACA provided me with good affordable care at a price I can afford $359 a month. I responded very well to BASIC medications for RA that I could never afford before (but with ACA can) and am now able to live life normally and run my small business again. My great Doctors also noticed I had serious liver damage from years of taking OTC pain relievers like Tylenol and Aleve. They were able to fix that too. They said it may have killed me or become cancer without treatment, at the least led to early death. If I lose coverage for my Meds am already planning to go on SSD and Medicaid and close my business. True Story. #ACAWORKS PS Only deplorables don’t want people to have health insurance.
Like · Reply · 1 · 19 hrs · Edited
Wendy Lannon
Wendy Lannon I think of you Nora whenever I hear people say ACA doesn’t work. #ACAWORKS

An advocate gets busy while every politician and “talking head” takes credit for healthcare model ideas published long ago.

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

I watched Barbara Starfield again last night. She passed away in 2011 but it seamed as though she was sitting in my living room telling me everything will be alright but many of us will never get our way. Barbara spent several decades studying the characteristics of health systems all over the world. Her final conclusions were simple and easy to implement as long as social agreements were made between consumers of healthcare services and their providers. The contract (sort of) is that my primary care doctor will be available when needed if I promise to contact his or her office before going to the ER for an earache or other non-emergent condition; my doctor also agrees to follow my care as I transition through life stages and address all mental and physical health conditions as they arise by assuring I connect with the correct specialist if required. The specialists in return are in constant contact with my primary care doctor so the primary care clinic is coordinating continuous and comprehensive care and reviewing all interactions between myself and other medical environments. Like I said earlier this week. Someone to watch over me. I first learned of Dr. Starfield in 2001 and followed her publications. Funny, she was never accepted to sit on any best-practice boards but the scientific community considered her work to be spectacular in terms of statistical approach and quality. In other words, she looked for the null hypothesis also.

Again…concerns over repeal and replace.

Some more diatribe with hope at sarcastic humor is written for you below. Please follow through to the end as I pasted a really cool graphic pointing you to a new society of consumers and professionals that might fix the system over the long run.

The conversation doesn’t stop at my dinner table, on my phone, through IM or Facebook. It seems as though my popularity index took a healthy bump after November 8th, 2016. I wish I could be happy about the reasons for the traffic.
“Jeff, you are on Medicare are you concerned?”

Well yes; you see, as we become older the likelihood of needing assistance from case managers, specialists, short stays in skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities increases. Same with home health services which is always the preferred place to recover from the self-inflicted fractured hip that occurred while my masculine ego informed me of my capacity to clean out my gutters.
One of the most important changes to the clinical language coming from Obamacare is the right for all patients cared for by primary care doctors with Medicare contracts to receive “Coordinated, Comprehensive Care”. Lately you might have heard the terms: “Patient Centered Care” or “Medical Home”. You probably heard President Elect Trump mention “Patient Centered” or a new commercial by Humana presented by a handsome young doctor stating that Humana’s system of Patient Centered Care is superior because of their capacity to coordinate your care within their “medical community”. Then you will watch a local conservative pundit state: “those stupid narrow networks tried through Obamacare didn’t work: here is a toast to repeal and replace.
This stuff cracks me up for the same proponents of patient centered care realize that closely collaborating narrow networks can provide you with clinical personnel that understand your needs better than anyone else! In fact, they have the same attributes of a Patient Centered Care Team using a single medical record and plan of care to increase safety and minimize mistakes. Yet you will hear no one (perhaps save me and a few of us that are tired of scraping the poop off our boots) tell you that the words Patient Centered, Narrow Network, Accountable Outcomes, Value Added Payment, Medical Homes, and all other terms implying a tightly coordinated, error free clinical team surrounding all patients are not original concepts. In fact, they are in place in many of our successful neighbor nations who provide universal enrollment and have always demonstrated lower reliance on emergency room services for basic medicine, better health outcomes and no difference in treatment effectiveness for cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other leading causes of premature mortality. Our own CMS (The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) have published the policy here July 2016:
So all of a sudden the administration of 2017 will be using terminology invented by others to describe care models that work after years of academic surveillance by healthcare policy analysists and already written into The Patient Protection Affordable Care Act or what the opponents call “Obama-Care”.
My prediction is we will keep the new payment systems for coordinated care and chronic disease care management. However, the credit for the success will fall under a new Trump label. My fears is that the same three insurance companies comprising the oligopoly of payers for American Healthcare will recoup their lost profits of mandated care without premium inflation for the chronically ill by shifting the premiums higher for those with pre-existing conditions. So here is another question from the week:
“Jeff, what will I do now I couldn’t get covered because of my history of cancer before the ACA?” “What if “Trump-care” requires coverage for pre-existing illnesses but allows insurance companies to include the illness in the premium pricing model? “ My response to this question was “not sure, my cost in the NC High Risk Insurance Pool for my diabetes prior to Obamacare was $1200.00 per month not including co-pays. Today it is $350.00.
More on Patient Centered Care AKA Medical Homes AKA Integrated Care AKA Chronic Illness Care.
I discussed the integrated care model and its payment adjustments to my Men’s group on Thursday night as they requested a primer on planning for their last ten years of life. Their hope was that our system of care had evolved and they would not have to lose their homes to cover the long-term care charges. Many of the guys in my group neglected to buy long term care insurance when they were young and healthy, had since suffered a chronic disease diagnosis and episode of treatment and no longer qualified for long term care insurance. They could however place $10 K per month into an account to pre-pay up to one year of long term care. This is what my father did: In 2006 he entered into a contract with a transitional care organization. He paid them $350,000 for full access to assisted living and long term care until his death. They also allowed him to live in the attached apartment complex for independent seniors for an additional rent of $3200 per month including one meal per day. Not a bad deal eh? Oh yeah…one more oversight: My friends ; all retired upper middle class professionals had no idea that Medicare didn’t pay for long term custodial care either in home or inpatient facility.
Now, like I said the other day, I am a bit tired of shouting the truth to those who were unfortunate enough to buy into the following promise: “Oh we will have the most wonderful healthcare system in the world” and “We promise to repeal the expensive policies and replace with something better.
We were on our way folks: The biggest mistake, President Obama’s team was denied the necessary Medicaid expansion for ALL not SOME States by our supreme courts. If you don’t understand the math I will be pleased to describe it in another column. Basically when the folks that would have had access to Medicaid don’t receive the insurance they still consume services. The loss of revenue winds up on the balance sheets of hospitals and providers and they respond by increasing their cost per service. The insurance companies pay more and your premiums increase. So… my neighbors policy (55 year old male) in NC costs $11,000 per year. The very same policy in New Hampshire where they expanded Medicaid costs $5,500 per year. As Mr. Obama leaves keep in mind that the rate of increase in health costs since the inception of Obama Care is the lowest it has been in 40 years.
Somehow, someway; we need to cover everybody. If we do not we cannot cover the losses incurred in the private sector without the Magical Thinking that has been sold you for so many decade. Hide the losses, get others to pay for the losses through modest increases in cost of living and blame the doctors, and hospitals who give away more free care than you could ever imagine.
What would happen if our incredible consumer driven internet harnessed the decision support technology that we use daily on Amazon and instantly brings the right service to you when needed should you or a loved one become ill? What if we harnessed IBM Watson to make the diagnosis thereby reducing error rates and reducing unnecessary utilization of expensive diagnostic procedures?
What if we didn’t need insurance companies any more to assess population risk and perform preauthorization services while we waited for our new medication?
Since we have all of the data connecting lifestyle, culture, nutrition, infection and the human genome can anyone appreciate where we are headed with our capacity to discover the cause of disease and effect of treatment? This is not decades from now my friends; it is within the reach of our children’s lifetime. I have wonderful friends with incredible scientific minds that are creating open source technologies to accomplish human collaboration like humankind has never witnessed. The only barrier to their success is a loss of priority to cure disease, increase well-being and expand the functional-years of human life.
Or…we can keep these technologies secret, forget those we have developed through the natural sequestration of competing private enterprise and traditional silo thinking. If this is where we are headed then the best investment to assure a painless end of life if you are not surrounded by humanitarian friends is my undying support for the second amendment. If you catch my drift.

Check out Right Care Folks!

Right Care Now

Right Care Now

From Obama to ObamaTrumpCare

someone-to-watch

Someone to watch over me…….
Dear Doctor, will you please make sure I receive the RIGHT CARE!
What do you know about me Doc?
Do you have time to spend with me today; perhaps discuss who I am in the world, what my goals are and what I think might help me feel better?
Are you interested in my Well-Being? Do you and your staff ever discuss Well-Being or is it all veiled in a pile of healthcare acronyms; where Well-Being is described by absence of symptoms and disease?
Do you have the opportunity to discuss my goals and interventions with my other doctors? Sometimes I am not sure you folks talk because my information: from religion and employment history to list of medicines varies between practices. I thought someone was fixing all of the electronic health record issues ten years ago?
I noticed that all of my personal physicians that I have chosen over the last fifteen years are selling their practice or merging into some sort of healthcare system that appears to be managed by the local hospital; is this a good thing? I am really not sure you see me because the person at the registration desk doesn’t recognize me and your Medical Assistant told me that you only had time for 10 a minute appointment today.
Actually, to be honest with you; I am concerned for your Well-Being Doc because you have dark circles below your eyes and tell me that you are up until 10:00 PM each night completing your records at home. I realize that the new electronic health records are cool but shouldn’t they increase your quality of life as opposed to drain any remaining discretionary time you have with your family?
Ya know Doc, I have learned allot about healthcare in my life: Yeah, some because of my training and work but mostly because I have these….”conditions”. The “conditions” have presented adequate challenge to require me to understand the “bits and pieces” that string this system together. I’ll bet you don’t learn much about being a patient in medical school. I am not sure how you could do it without adding another two years to your fourteen years of post-grad education.
Did you know that I have spent ten hours in the last month trying to get a prescription authorized? You know the prescription that makes living with RSD and diabetic neuropathy tolerable! It appears that someone didn’t install your e-prescribing system correctly; something to do with prescription received and filled acknowledgments? I don’t know Man; it seems like the fax machine and pharmacy calls worked better than this e-Rx stuff. The long and short of it is that between your practice, my insurance carrier, and my CVS pharmacy the most efficient transaction I can hope for when I am in pain is 48 hours. My “Well-Being” wasn’t so “Well” this month…..
BUT my A1c is 6.5, my blood pressure is 124/78, my immunizations and other measures of health process and management outcomes are all great. I am pleased to be one of the good data points on your quality report and certainly testify to CMS and Blue Cross that you deserve an extra 5% for your hard work. Might be nice though if I received a discount on my insulin copay for the snappy A1c that has kept my feet attached to my legs and my body out of the hospital these last 50 years.

So what is Right Care? How do we know if we get it? Is it through the Diabetes DM report? Is it through the patient satisfaction survey that I take at each and every service provider I see? They all are very similar, I wonder if anyone has ever considered a “whole system measure”; at least something better than the Service Excellence Survey that reminds me of the material sent to me by American Airlines after every business trip. By the way, I always give my providers 5 stars with the exception of the conglomerate that bought up the primary care practices; their employees seem miserable. I find it amusing that their employees all where buttons that say “Ask me about the “Name of Healthcare Institutions” WAY. I guess they all have some kind of culture that is supposed to make my experience less painful as a consumer? Perhaps more like Disney Land I suppose.
What I really long for is my diabetes pediatrician from 1965. Dr. Lipmann. He always asked me to discuss how I was feeling about school, whether I had enough to eat at home, did I have any dreams and whether or not my diabetes would prevent me from achieving my dreams. Heck, he called me on Sunday night to as how I was feeling when my urine sugars were running 4 plus. When I left his care at the age of thirteen he had illuminated an interest in human biology that has carried me through my life. On a darker side of my childhood life he also notified “Children’s Protective Services” when he discovered I was living in an alcoholic flop-house!
My friend Tony is from another country. His mom had a CVA last year. She was transported to the ER, hospitalized, transferred to a facility with real rehabilitation specialists and doctors on staff daily, discharged home with visiting nurses and therapists and returned to society as a healthy 75 year old woman who is now completely independent. Her cost? Well there was no cost to her and the average cost per person for health services in her country is 1/2 of what it is in the USA.
In meeting with my insurance adviser the other day I was informed that my healthcare cost will be more than $500,000 between now and my death; with my diabetes, RSD, neuropathy etc. I wonder how we will cover the services. I really don’t want to be one of those patients that I cared for early on in my career. You know….like the old man and WWII B17 Aviator that looked up at me shortly before he died and said “Ya know Jeff; I used to be somebody once”.
The end of his life was no different than my fathers. Dad died last year from pneumonia at the age of 87. We had just celebrated Memorial Day. He called me complaining of a chest cold and 48 hours later I found myself sitting at his bedside with new onset dementia, consolidated breath sounds, a temperature of 101 degrees and abdominal cramps. I asked the Nursing Assistant to get him a bed pan and she informed me that he “just got off the pan”. A few minutes later I overheard her complaining to her supervisor that she had no intention of getting my Pop out of bed because he was a difficult transfer due to his combativeness. Pop was angry for sure but not combative. Then I witnessed the IV nurse insert a 18 gauge catheter into my pops wrist. She never registered IV access and proceeded to deliver 500 cc of solution into the sub-cutaneous space. This was the only vein he had left since they had made the same error the night before in the opposite hand. By 6PM his hand was as large as a soft-ball and this was hours after I complained about her technique.
So the following day Pop got a PICC line. PICC lines are infection risks!

Three days later I took him to the SNF with his PICC line and met with the therapists. Dad was becoming more lucid but I had concerns. I met with the Charge Nurse and facility director to assure his good care. I was concerned about the additional risk for infection from his new PICC line. You see, this facility was part of his life-long $450,000 investment in a continuing care environment; supposedly the best available in Huntsville Alabama. I used to direct clinical services departments in these facilities earlier in my career and was aware of their financial strain as they attempted to deliver hospital level care for 1/3 the cost.
I saw Pop the next day while he was cycling on the recumbent bicycle in the rehabilitation department. He had 20 minutes of therapy to go but as soon as I showed up to watch his work-out the therapist terminated the session and quickly wheeled Pop to his room so we could chat. Dad looked horribly sad, I knelt down to say good-bye kissing him on the forehead I said “I love you Dad!”; he looked up and said “And I love you Jeff”. These were our last words.
Three days later I received a call at 3AM from a person who could not speak English. He mentioned my father’s name and I asked for someone who could speak more clearly. The second person I spoke with also could not speak English. Finally a paramedic picked up the phone…”Mr. Harris, your father is unresponsive and we are taking him to the hospital”.
After a quick dialog I was able to determine that Pop had explosive diarrhea several hours earlier and simply lost consciousness. I called ahead to the Emergency Department to inform them of my father’s forthcoming arrival and that I was worried he might be septic. I told the doctor that Pop was a DNR patient and he should call me when he arrived. When Pop was evaluated the ER Doctor called me with his lab results and it was quite evident that he was dying and most certainly had been allowed to dehydrate while at the Rehabilitation Hospital OOPS I mean Skilled Nursing Facility OOPS I am not sure what I mean. God did I weep as the ER doctor and I discussed his DNR.
I wrestle with the fact that I might have been able to save Pop if I had pushed for re-hydration, antibiotics and other therapy but I couldn’t help think about Pops state of well-being. You see my brother and I had spent years shuffling him around between neurosurgery in Birmingham and other clinical facilities. At one point I had imitated a physician to keep my father from being discharged prematurely after his brain tumor operation. He had been in the hospital for a week. The Medicare Prospective Payment was going to pay for eight days and the hospital was pushing him out to a skilled nursing facility. I watched my Pop eating and realized he had an aspiration problem. Fearful of aspiration pneumonia I asked to have him discharged to the rehabilitation beds at the University Medical Center. I wanted him to receive a speech language therapy evaluation for aspiration risk and rehabilitation services. To get the transfer to rehabilitation where a doctor and therapists would be available; I had to retrieve every clinical skill I had when meeting with the staff to justify his case. When they assumed I was a doctor, I let it ride. Feeling shame the next day I convinced myself that I would do whatever I needed to protect my father.
You know, to make sure he would receive the
Right Care.

As the ACA (Obamacare) was implemented I began to have hope. You see, this year 2017 is the beginning of Medicare’s observation of how well inpatient hospitals and post-acute care facilities integrate. One important measure they are watching is the frequency of readmission to acute care for the same diagnosis. This combined measure of how well institutions, nursing homes, home health networks and primary care communicate regarding a patient’s process as they are handed off between facilities is to prevent patients from becoming ill and requiring re-hospitalization. Trust me folks, it used to be horrible: I can remember turning patients around as they arrived at our rehabilitation hospital and sending them straight back to the Medical Center that had just discharged them. You see, some were still in heart failure and semi-conscious; not only could they not participate in rehabilitation; to attempt rehabilitation might have killed them. But you see, the hospitals were not linked to the rehabilitation and skilled nursing facilities through a common therapeutic goal and reimbursement mechanism. The hospital in Boston just wanted to discharge the patient prior to exceeding their Medicare reimbursement allotment. We however had marketing nurses out in the field accepting any warm body with a heartbeat that just might survive a 21 day Medicare stay in a Skilled Nursing Environment.
My friends had no idea why I never lost my job by reversing the trajectory of these patients. What they did not know was that I had a compassionate family owned corporation employing me who trusted my clinical intuition.
Alas… as of today….Obamacare is being repealed and we have yet to be informed about “TrumpCare”. My guess us that we will return to the past with the exception of mandatory care for persons with pre-existing conditions. Then we will see just how much our policies cost and what our end of year out of pocket expense will be.
For my wife and I,
We are searching once more for our peeps. This week I have looked at my well-being through the end of my life if we ex-patriate to Canada. My cost will be $0.00 for healthcare. My waiting time for a CAT scan will double but Canada’s outcomes for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease and diabetes are slightly better than in the USA. So what do we have to lose? In fact, Canada doesn’t amputate many diabetic limbs. You know why? Because all of their diabetics have access to care!

Fondly thinking of you fellow patients and consumers;
Jeffrey Halbstein-Harris
• An advocate for those who feel lost
• Always watching
• Harnessing the compassion that surrounds you in a time of crisis
• Connecting you with the best science available
• Minding your pocketbook
• Working to return you home safely

Community Care of North Carolina goes for the gold: Proving valid reduction in hospitalization among Medicaid enrollees with Chronic Disease

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

I have not been posting much lately due to activities with the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative. We are working on an analysis of accreditation standards which will ultimately be used to verify Medical Home processes, procedures and clinical outcomes. Check out their website as you consumer types will have a chance to see what others are doing for you to assure you access to the best in health care as we reform the system over the next few decades.

I am very enthusiastic these days as I am seeing the changes I have hoped for my entire life as person with diabetes since 1966. As a child my doctor was always available to teach how to master my illness and provide tips with mechanisms I could use to reduce my cost: especially when I entered college. My docs have been so cool, I can never adequately thank them. Purchasing a glucometer and testing reagents for me when I was uninsured; providing free laser therapy when my employer dumped the plan I had in favor of becoming self insured. If you want an interesting read see an old post of mine titled Physician heroes.

Today I call your attention to Community Care of NC. The organization that employed me as their clinical informatics lead back in 2002. These folks are using a model of population management and patient care that I had seen work in Massachusetts in the 1990s. To that end my wife and I moved here in 2001 to work for CCNC. They use a centralized partnership between private healthcare industry and public agencies including Medicaid, Public Health, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, the NC Medical Society and the local branch or thee Academy of Family Physicians.

The central teams keep improving patient targeting and clinical outcomes analysis using a variety of statistical sources and deliver regionalized community information from 12 different 501c3 Community Care Networks. The individual Networks then put care coordinators, case managers, pharmacists and administrative staff in place to create local flavors of patient centered care. All have guiding physician committees and other staff who collaborate with subspecialists as well as local hospitals. The net result is a care continuum surrounding the sickest individuals where the team focuses on goals set by the patient, their family and the team. They have been doing this for fifteen years now and I can attest to the fact that they are one of only a few Patient Centered Medical Home Networks in the country that are using a web-native care plan accessible to all on the patient team as well as multiple other physician practice improvement web apps totally focused on education, assessment of each doctors population and measurement of patient outcome.

This week they published the proof in the pudding. After long struggles against threats to defund the program they survived. They are now audited in full and have demonstrated hospital utilization rates falling at 10% per year in the chronic disease population. We are talking HUNDREDS of MILLIONS of DOLLARS in savings folks on top of hugely improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with their sense of well-being.

I have always said that I needed a lot of help in my life. Since I knew how to assemble a care team for myself I figured I may as well help others do the same. Today, in 2015 we have the mechanisms in play to reconnect patients with their physicians. Please step up and teach your docs about your needs, wants and struggles as it will take us a while to walk out of the woods.

nc hospitalization trends under CCNC

Self-Interest as the cornerstone of failure in Americas Healthcare System

I fear we will lose  the opportunity to re-think the legislative changes required to assure the success of the Affordable Care Act. Instead it might simply die. My reasoning is clear. The original work lost all structural integrity in terms of economic sustainability. This was the outcome of supporters of the legislation sacrificing so many critical features to corporate interests.

I am exhausted and have few words left.  Why do we cling to fears, doubts and insecurities that were issues of the  Cold War.  “Oh we can’t consider universal coverage as this is a Socialist construct.

If we look round us, all civilized nations figured out a long time ago that universal coverage is mandatory for the economics of health-care to be self-sustaining.  Here is my response to a recent petition. I hope my readers will take it seriously.

Sue, I have decided to discontinue any business that UntangledHealth.com has with Staples. Then again, I only purchase two computers per year and will not make a dent in their bottom line. At the same time it is important for all to understand that this has less to do with the legality of the situation than the moral standards we choose to live by in America.We have a wonderful opportunity through a free enterprise system to create huge personal wealth. Personal, now translates to corporations as individuals. Self-Interest stimulates wonderful innovation yet unless closely monitored for “intent” will consume a society in short order.

 

 

Plenty of historical examples: eg: other empires. For those active in the E-Patient Movement or Patient, Family, Community Centered  Medical Home Movement or E-Health Movement you have a responsibility to weigh-in on the economic issues in health-care. Please add your wisdom, we need you.   JFH

Obama Phones: We continue to justify our prejudice through cerebral intercourse – tidbit on health-care cost

YIKES!

I recently was involved in a discussion with a beloved friend. We were both upset about what we thought were inappropriate entitlements and the forthcoming ‘fiscal cliff’. The topic of choice was cell-phone entitlement programs and my friend stated that Obama had expanded a program for free cell-phones for the indigent; calling them ‘Obama-Phones’.

I said in our conversation, “people do scam these programs and it aggravates me as well but I need to look into it.” “I am aware of and FCC ‘life-line’ program that benefits many people like myself who have diabetes, asthma, heart disease and so on, so I cannot throw out the legislation without a careful review.” I further discussed antiquated FCC protection regulations for rural areas and how these original ‘anti-trust’ laws gave rise to local monopolies allowing community entrepreneurs to monopolize the telecom industry across multiple adjacent counties in NC. This is a real case that requires thorough investigation as it drives out competition from more efficient providers like Time Warner subsequently costing a former Health Center client of mine to spend $8000 per month in ISP fees. I could have purchased better technology for 50% of the fee if my client relocated 50 miles North. The legislation traces back to the Ma Bell days and like all population based protection and entitlement programs now requires review and appropriate action based on the current environment. ‘Zillions’ of influencing variables exist that drive up our cost and inefficiencies!

What troubles me is that the Web is being used to post video and text which propagates ignorance and judgment. Everyone is now an expert in tax-reform, the fiscal cliff, health-care and so on. The truth is: most Americans have no idea how these programs work; especially our elected officials who do not recognize the natural escalation of entitlement programs that are bound to public health standards yet provided by a self-defining ‘free-market’.

In my career I have seen organization CEOs sell company’s for $Millions$ that provided decision guidelines for denying insurance coverage. I have seen these guidelines be put to use to deny hospice coverage. I hope you get my point: In this case I was reviewing a denial on a dead-man.

The factors inflating healthcare and entitlement program costs over time relate to a natural human tendency to place self-interest above all else: After all didn’t Adam Smith use this as the fundamental driver for capitalism?

Of course we have a Fiscal Cliff! I suggest it is time we place the black and white (no-pun intended but interesting end-point) definitions of liberal and conservative  politics in the hopper. The extremists among us are using our ignorance and fear to further split our country in two. I welcome all to leave out names, political affiliations and institutions out of their commentary and begin speaking to the issues as human beings. Let me model a comment for you that brings an issue into the spotlight.

On free cell phones:
“I was informed recently that our free cell phone program is expanding and people are getting these that do not need them. I have also been told that these are old rules which expanded under the present administration. I do not believe America can afford this program. I fear the fiscal cliff may end our way of life. I hope someone can explain the details to me.”

You will note that I:

1) described ‘overheard’ data

2) made a judgment

3)pointed to a financial fear

4)asked for help.

Here is the best answer I could find on the Web:
Snopes Obama-Phones

Here’s to a collaborative future!

Jeffrey Harris aka ‘Halbstein’

 

 

IOM Panel finds $750B wasted per year in US Healthcare

Blessings

I love the Institute of Medicine. Much time this week trying to explain the multiple factors contributing to high-cost, ineffective healthcare. Well the IOM published a wonderful paper yesterday describing the issues and contrasting them to other industries. One cleat take-home is the need to preserve the Affordable Care Act and step up as patients this voting season. The answer is not vouchers folks. The answer is adaptive engineering as many have been saying for…well fifteen years at least.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to save $750B per year without cutting Medicare.

It is all at stake!

We all have our lives at stake in this battle. Unless we can learn to sacrifice; our children will suffer. You see…I do not believe that the human species has evolved to a point where individuals have the capacity to self-sacrifice; with the exception of extreme examples such as during war-time or in protection of one’s children.
For 32 years I have struggled to bite my lip and lay my tears on the kitchen table as I discussed the in-humanity and utter disregard for patients and their family systems. In many cases, the bitten lip did not provide enough negative reinforcement to keep my thoughts to myself. As many know, in our society the messenger is routinely sacrificed for the preservation of shareholders equity.
Life has delivered me here. Where I no longer worry what others think…I do not want their jobs and am ready to move on with what life I have.
Sleep escapes me some nights. Memories you see fuel my energy to protest the state of shameful dysfunction in American Healthcare. If we lose the progress established in the last three years, we will return. Return to a place I cannot forget.
In 1995 I was a clinical program manager for a ventilator weaning unit. We made our money through operating outside of the restriction of acute in-patient hospital care. In other words, it did not matter how long our patients were in the hospital as we were reimbursed for each day of service.
My job as Program Manager included traveling to hospitals in New York City to evaluate patients in hospitals that could not be weaned from their ventilators. If our facilities were capable of handling the needs of the patient we would transfer them two hundred miles to treat them in our acute rehabilitation hospitals. There was another criterion: We only admitted individuals with sufficient reserve wealth to cover our services.
So I stepped off of our company airplane one summer day in Boston to be greeted by our Senior Vice President. He asked me; “How was the trip Jeff, do you think we could take these ‘cases’”? I said: “The trip was exhausting Mr. XXXXXX, I believe we can take six of the eight we reviewed but don’t think we will be able to wean more than two from their life support.”
As Mr.XXXXXX reviewed the financial assets of each ‘case’ he asked me; “How about this one, how long do you think she will live?”
Thinking of the patient, her family who would not be able to visit and the loss of her personal property that was to be inherited by her grandchildren; I returned home for the evening, placed my head on my wife’s shoulder…and wept.

New Cartoon Describing Cost Shifting – Cost Sharing…Enjoy

YIKES!

Congress Passes Socialized Medicine and Mandates Health Insurance – In 1798 | The Health Care Blog

 

 

God Help Us

Congress Passes Socialized Medicine and Mandates Health Insurance – In 1798 | The Health Care Blog.

Please take a peek at my response.

Here is the historical reference in my blog response to the responses to the author in THCB.

EMTALA requires hospital Emergency Rooms must triage, evaluate and treat uninsured patients that  show up in the ER. This means many folks get primary care services in the Emergency Room and if you look at hospital fiscal charge off expenses many are in this category due to non-payment.

DSH payments are Federally backed State payments currently received by hospitals that care for uninsured at a disproportionately high ratio to insured patients when compared to normal facilities.

Under PPACA mandatory enrollment will reduce DSH payments if not cut them completely.