Untangled Health

Consumers Unite To Drive The Changes We Need

Tag: Partnership for Prescription Assistance

My Overstressed Physician (Prior Authorizations, Referrals, Stress, Prescription Assistance Programs, Electonic Health Records and More)

The following video covers just one aspect of my concerns regarding the infringement on Patient Centered Care by the “Business of Medicine”. I have reflected in the past about the cumbersome “Business Process Centered” components of health care delivery that prevent our providers (Doctor, Nurses, Technicians, Therapists ETC.) from focusing on the “Big Picture”. What I am referring to are the dimensions of health that require thorough assessment and attention to detail for the treating provider to accurately judge what is happening in our body, draft a treatment plan and execute the orders. Right Care to me is my team’s full understanding of my biology, culture, mental health and physical health needs, the social roles I play in my community and the support available in my community when it is necessary for me to stay healthy and productive.

During my visits to my doctor the processes’ of assessment, diagnosis, planning, intervention and monitoring are interlinked and any disruption will present a barrier and possibly introduce an error in treatment or missed opportunity to cure a silent condition. These missed opportunities to improve our health are often referred to as Co-missions or Omissions in care. Co-missions occur when our medications interact and cause an exacerbation of an existing illness or cause a new illness to occur. An example might be the treatment of a person with Diabetes who is taking insulin with a Beta-blocking drug such as Metoprolol. This might cause hypoglycemic Unawareness  and the patient will not be aware of a low blood sugar. An example of an Omission in Care  is when a patient is unable to continue taking a medication. The lack of evidence of prescription refills in the patient medical record might create and alert for the doctor to review, but one cannot assume that this is always the case. Beyond being aware of the missed refill the doctor or the clinics Care Coordinators should follow-up with the patient to determine the reason for non-compliance with the patients care-plan. In America financial reasons often prevent us from being able to adhere to our medication regimen and the answer to the dilemma can be as simple as contacting the drug manufacturer and applying for funds through a Prescription Assistance Program. The #partnership for Prescription Assistance is an organization that will help those with financial resource issues. So, what do you do if your doctor doesn’t have the time to spend educating you to look out for hypoglycemic unawareness, refer you to a Prescription Assistance Program or get transportation to the clinic each month for your periodic check of your blood clotting time? Should all of us be self-sufficient with these skills? I suppose in a perfect world this might be the case, but I certainly wouldn’t place this responsibility on the average lower to middle class patient today. We are far too busy just making ends meet and in many cases our health suffers.

Electronic Health Records were our great hope for unburdening the provider and the clinic staff from clerical activities that are required in the day-to-day management of a population of patients. The average primary care provider often has 2000 patients unless they are a concierge practice; which the average Joe or Jame cannot afford. Your referral to the laboratory for routine blood sampling frequently requires the doctor to link the appropriate diagnosis with the lab test or the chart will not close out after the visit and the order will not be communicated to the lab  performing your test. Today, I watched my doctor and his “documentation specialist” carefully navigate several screens in the EMR as the doctor ordered various labs and cross linked them to my problem list. These processes make a lot of sense when they relate to care quality. For example, you do not want a doctor to order tests that are not going to increase his or her knowledge of what’s ailing you.  However, in the cases I see today; and I see a lot since I am a person with multiple chronic illnesses: My doctor is dancing to the tune of the Insurance Company and looking over his back to make sure he isn’t over-utilizing or mis-utilizing his privilege to order expensive diagnostic procedures: When I see my doctor stressed out,  rushing through and missing pieces of his exam: I start to fret that he will leave his present employment and I will lose yet another good primary care physician (I have lost three in the last five years for these reasons).

So my doctor is overwhelmed with filling in the correct fields in a health record to avoid penalties from his administration. My quality of care is declining. The burden in my opinion is a caused by an over-complicated system created by folks interested in the possibilities of Big Data AND the residual business process requirements of a Managed Care Business Model that no longer is valid since our doctors today come well prepared to make high quality decisions based on the published  best practices emerging from the literature accompanied by embedded decision support in their information systems; or has someone been fibbing about what the technology does for us?

Are you willing to step up and work with your doctor to define and deliver the Right Care by the Right People, at the Right Time, in the Right Place?