Untangled Health

Consumers Unite To Drive The Changes We Need

Tag: Patients Like Me

Open-Access Guidelines for Patient-Centered Care (The tools we need are here!)

patient logo

How do I find the best treatment for me? Is it my doctors choice? Do I have anything to say about it? Is it possible that my doctor is unaware of best treatments?

Taken from the British Medical Journal. Click link to view the Aortic Valve Replacement Guideline.“The BMJ launched an innovative strategy to promote patient partnership in 2014. It took this step because it sees partnering with patients, their families, careers and support communities, and the public as an ethical imperative, which is essential to improving the quality, safety, value, and sustainability of health systems.”

 

My suggestions:

Make sure you read the educational material your clinic gives you at the end of the visit then compare it with what you are able to find independently. This is most important when you are diagnosed with a new condition or your doctor recommends a diagnostic or surgical or therapeutic procedure. By the way, new medicines are therapeutic procedures.

Since errors happen…what I choose to call Therapeutic Misadventures I like to check out the current best practices and research outcomes published in Europe, Japan and the USA.

Cool Tools are here!  Everyone knows that I am a big promoter of physician-patient partnership when it comes to researching treatment methodologies and selecting interventions for our personal care-plans. I received notice today on the MAGIC projects publication of guidelines in the British Medical Journal. This particular guideline is for Aortic Valve Replacement. BMJ provides an online experience for doctors and patients called Partnering with Patients. The  content provided on the site includes best practice guidelines for many medical procedures. One source of the guidelines is MAGIC project.

This is an international group, originating in Oslo, Norway operating as the MAGIC project. Magic is an acronym for “MAking GRADE the Irresistible Choice,” where GRADE is a system to develop high-quality guidelines that consider the whole body of evidence on a certain therapy in an objective way, and incorporate patient values and preferences, as well as other considerations.

For the consumer this implies the MAGIC team applies a scientific rigor to weighting the evidence supporting the effectiveness of medical and surgical interventions. The real bonus is that they also employ the patient’s perception of effectiveness which can often be missing in research studies. A common example I like to use is change in mortality rate. Example: If I have emphysema and experience failure of my respiratory system I will die. However, there is a variety of life sustaining interventions available to me in the USA. These include: Supplemental Oxygen, inhaled and oral medications and mechanical ventilation. Virtually all people with severe emphysema are faced with making a decision as to the technologies they will use to extend their life. Many choose all three: Then again, I have had many patients in the past elect to not receive mechanical ventilation as the notion of being connected to a ventilator for the remainder of their life is not acceptable.

When any of us with chronic illness take advantage of a therapy I would hazard a guess that we should always take the pre and post treatment morbidity and functional status into account. Questions we need to ask must include the published guidelines reported changes in health related quality of life after treatment.

I hope these projects become the foundation for a curated library of best practice and treatment outcomes in the near future. Of course my preference would be to make them free for patients which might level the playing-field for those with low incomes in societies with huge disparities in care and health between the wealthy and impoverished. That said, as I learn more about the availability of the guidelines and find those that are free and unbiased by funding resource or error in design I will publish them here.

Have fun and educate yourself prior to making any decisions on how to manage your health.

Warmth to all of my friends along the way.

Jeffrey 

Here are link to Magic

 

The Onslow Magic Project for clinical guidelines

 

 

What is at risk if Obamacare is Rescinded

Reconciling data in my six health portals

What is at risk for all subscriber to commercial insurance programs if Obamacare is Rescinded?

This analysis with specific allegorical references was posted by my friend Wendy today. I find it accurate and far beyond my skills to interpret and describe What is at risk for EVERY-BODY

Obama Care is. . . The ACA (Affordable Care Act)
Last night as his first order of business the new president signed an executive order to repeal the ACA. Here’s what this means… even if you are safely covered behind employer-provided insurance, the protections set forth in the ACA (Affordable Care Act), apply to you too. And if those protections are repealed along with the rest (or any part) of the program, you will also be affected.
That means you may be trapped in a job, because your pre-existing condition may mean you will not qualify for new insurance offered by another employer, and the cost of private insurance would be prohibitive. If your employer shuts down, lays you off, or even changes insurers, well, you are out of luck. The Senate GOP voted this week that they would not require an eventual ACA replacement to protect against discrimination for pre-existing conditions, which was the standard before the ACA.
It means that you (a young adult under the age of 26) or your adult children (over 18) may find yourselves without the protection of insurance, as the Senate GOP voted last night that an eventual ACA replacement will not be required to allow young people to remain on their parents’ insurance up to the age of 26.
It means that if you have a high-risk pregnancy, or life-threatening illness such as cancer, you may not be able to afford all the care you need, because you may hit lifetime or annual caps. If you have an infant born with any kind of severe medical condition, or premature, they may hit their lifetime insurance cap before they are old enough to walk. The Senate GOP voted last night that an eventual ACA replacement program would not be required to prohibit lifetime insurance caps.
It means that if you are a struggling parent who is uninsured or under-insured, you will no longer be able to count on at least your kids getting the routine medical and dental care they need under the Children’s Health Insurance Plan (CHIP). The Senate GOP voted that CHIP is not required to be protected by an eventual ACA replacement.
These provisions of the ACA affect everyone in this country, not just those without insurance through their employers.
If you are not okay with these changes, call your representatives and let them know what’s important to you. Nothing has been set in stone yet, but our legislators have shown us a map of what they plan to do if constituents don’t make their voices heard loud and clear.
Hold down here to copy, paste, and post (do not share) on your timeline, if you feel this information needs to be passed on.

This is a comment from NORA on FaceBook
As a person with R.A. (pre-existing condition) Before ACA I was never able to purchase even basic insurance for under $1500 a month and thus went without insurance from the time I graduated University until I was 49 years old. It’s $2000 per visit to a Rheumatologist, so I only went once a year and could not afford medications. I lived with daily debilitating pain and exhaustion among other things. If you know somebody with RA you know is serious. ACA provided me with good affordable care at a price I can afford $359 a month. I responded very well to BASIC medications for RA that I could never afford before (but with ACA can) and am now able to live life normally and run my small business again. My great Doctors also noticed I had serious liver damage from years of taking OTC pain relievers like Tylenol and Aleve. They were able to fix that too. They said it may have killed me or become cancer without treatment, at the least led to early death. If I lose coverage for my Meds am already planning to go on SSD and Medicaid and close my business. True Story. #ACAWORKS PS Only deplorables don’t want people to have health insurance.
Like · Reply · 1 · 19 hrs · Edited
Wendy Lannon
Wendy Lannon I think of you Nora whenever I hear people say ACA doesn’t work. #ACAWORKS

SalesForce as a Patient-Centered Longitudinal Care Platform | I am one happy Diabetic!

The technology facilitating Patient Centered Care arrived over ten years ago. It was all a matter of configuration!

The technology facilitating Patient Centered Care arrived over ten years ago. It was all a matter of configuration!

I am pumped!
Years ago…1997 I believe; I had a job working for DocSite: the company founded by Physiatrist John Haughton MD that became one of the premier Registry products used as the EMR community was attempting to define itself. In the DocSite product we collected measures or “clinical indicators” that were compiled around the patient and associated with an infinity of conditions. Essentially the data design allowed physicians and grant recipients to have a single patient record yet extract, analyze and report on any constellation of outcome measures without having to spend money on redundant disease registry products. Example: Blood pressure is an important measurement for diabetes and heart failure. In diabetes the measure importance is 1) how often it is done and 2) the blood pressure value. In Heart failure the same measures of process (measurement frequency) and outcome (BP value) are required but they might be different depending on the cardiovascular guideline and contrasting diabetes guideline. In the DocSite system the blood pressure recording was simply a vital sign. The rules defining threshold for compliance with guideline were defined separately and associated with multiple conditions. When the doctor generated the data for PQRI and the Cardiovascular Excellence programs a single patient outcomes dataset was generated based on the programs associated with the patient. When the patient returned to any clinician using the Docsite system the Visit Encounter Sheet displayed the current measures due, the last values and trends for each measure and gave the physician or extender a place to generate an education note. Inexpensive, simple, multi-user, modifiable for EBG and data submission automated through clerical “generate and send PQRI data”. Now, I owned some stock in the company so I am biased but quite frankly I thought the system was elegant once it received data feeds from pharma and labs!

All of us at DocSite used a Client Relationship Management cloud application in our client services department. After using it for three years or so those of us that had worked in a previous company “the forerunner of DocSite” called Cognimed all thought that Sales Force had the proper design to create a community wide care coordination and patient centered care planning tool We had built one in the 1990s and sold it and moved on with our lives.
Today I see SalesForce has entered the arena. Knowing what I know about its capabilities I hope they capture the market by landslide. Please if you thinking about building a new care management platform…dont. As a patient, I would love to see this thing as an App. in all of my clinicians hands and on my IPhone please. Check out their demo. I am sure it all does not work as advertised but I can attest to the fact that they had the correct data model ten years ago!

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Time to pull the sheet out from underneath healthcare in America. In one step. Eliminate Insurance, Medicare, Government Programs, and see what we come up with. Please leave a note on my grave as to the outcome.

someone-to-watch

Thank you friends from LinkedIn today. Those discussing our frustration and describing a need to sit down and discuss the disaster that was and the disaster that will be.

Without action that-is!

Rephrased: My friend states our Medical system is far to complicated and polluted with bad ideas to resolve through a bunch of silo business meetings of silo organizations who define for us consumers exactly what health is, what we need to consume to maintain it and how much we should pay!

My point was to provoke: Strictly because I have similar judgments. I recently have seminar to senior men on functional decline over life for avg American male. Then overlay of possible interventions and services through death. Then described business layer and regulatory layer.
Your point Bruce Pisetzner is precisely why we need to define the pain for all stakeholders. When I say “stakeholder” I include consumers from all socio-economic classes as well as the professionals who treat them and the “business opportunities” created between 1965 and today that supposedly state a clear value added to the system of care.
Spent my career sketching iterations of your shell games. It seems to me: and I hold a straw-man judgment; that 1) as a country we have no agreement on what “health”is e.g. functional status, emotional status, absence of disease, bio-psychosocial well being etc. Far too much room to allow a free-market enterprise to explode without revisiting what is necessary to achieve healthy population goals.
Then of course we have the employer – employee entanglement.
Then of course the Government – Defined Benefit issue.
As patient with chronic disease, provider – admin acute care for 8, provider-admin post acute for 10, HIT product architect for 10 and community healthcare integration consultant for 10; predictive analyst for 8: I have watched the money flow. Oh how I have watched the money flow. Some even into my pocket. $25K a year out to stay alive and well with diabetes.
Perhaps it is time we all tell the truth. Insurance company, Large Employers, Small Employers, Provider Types, Patient Types and so on.

I created this blog post on the fly but thought it important to get out here now!

cropped-stcroix-jeff.pngsevere retinopathy

Hello Darkness My Old Friend…

I am witnessing an illogical social rage emerge that “if we are not steadfast to our principles of tolerance and acceptance” could ignite into a civil crisis even greater than what I (we) witnessed in the 60s and early 70s.
The content displayed on the Internet is usually present for a single purpose: to sell an idea.
So now we have evidence of dishonesty and amoral behavior.
As I chase material down to its source I find frequently that the information is genuine but stretched beyond its context. Meaning: a video purporting to expose poor security architecture of a 10 year old vote tabulation computer is released from a blog that claims a vast conspiracy to undermine our election process. However, the machine tested was studied through “real scientific procedure” by Stanford years ago and found to be defective, thereby causing the vendor to lose its contracts with election management authority’s .
The video published within the last few days had a single intent: convince the public that we have a crisis in our voting apparatus and a probable conspiracy.
On the same blog the moderator claims our support of foreigners in need is far greater than our effort to support those of us on Social Security. ” How can our Government support thousands of Syrian refugees when it can not give a raise to Soc. Security recipients!”
These words are meant to do nothing but divide us.
On another blog I find the video of a silly man embarrassing himself by making petty comments regarding his power over women. The guy was 59 years old and behaving like an adolescent braggart. Ask me if I care. I think I am intelligent enough to not consider him suitable for public office through listening to his speech alone; let alone some silly dialog he had with a Hollywood “Child” .
Now Most of my friends and I are not content with our choices in this election cycle. However, we know we can survive another 4 years waiting for another leader to emerge if we vote for Sec. Clinton.
But the generation below me: the folks that didn’t experience the Cold War, Vietnam, Students being shot on campus, the pictures in Time of beautiful men hanging from trees by their neck throughout the South. The beginning of and final failure of the war on drugs, Project Apollo.
They can’ t seem to realize that corruption is everywhere but reflected by genuine love and collaborative effort in the very same moment.
The candidates in our election today are simply warning lights on our social dashboard : bringing our attention to our fear of powerlessness, loss of faith in humanity and capacity to understand how each of us is perfectly imperfect. From George Washington to Whoever wins this election ; all of our leaders , all of our heroes have nasty moments along their life-path; They were and are human also.
I think it is time to silence our voices, lay down our pens and video recording devices and sit down for a discussion. Perhaps a discussion that will illuminate our fears, doubts, insecurities, desires, hopes and dreams. Through this work we might once again find our commonalities and work together to re-form our nation.
We are broken…..I think, but not irreparable.

Enjoy

Celebrating physicians who stick with patients that are non-compliant due to financial barriers.

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

 

 

 

THERE ARE LIVES IN THE BALANCE

 

This is a synopsis of my attempt to bring affordable timely retina care to impoverished people with diabetes in Eastern NC. I sent this note to the Medicaid Managed Care entity: Community Care of North Carolina and was able to schedule a meeting as a result.

To: The Executive Director of North Carolina Community Care Networks,

“I have three retina ophthalmologists with nine clinics in four counties that are willing to take Medicaid patients. When I retired they asked me what I wanted to do. They had saved my eyesight and I told them that the disparity in services in NC had been my chief frustration since moving here. I said I would like to find as many diabetics as possible who were not compliant with retinal screening or follow-up care due to financial barriers. They agreed to treat as many as I could find after reading my proposal.

Many physicians are dropping Medicaid patients in NC. I have found some excellent, compassionate doctors who want to help.
Will you please help me strategize for an outreach effort. I will do all the work.”

I created a program guide for Medicaid describing access rules and services available. I started with Medicaid because their process outcomes revealed 40%-50% of diabetics missing annual eye exams. Furthermore this was in counties where over 1/3 of the diabetic populations had poor control (A1c > 9%) and therefore were more likely to have disease of the retina.

I met with the Community Care folks who (in my opinion) have a wonderful care coordination and patient centered care model. They informed me that they couldn’t perform specialty referrals as it showed preferential treatment. I responded with:” Many ophthalmologists do not see Medicaid patients and your data point out an underserved chronically ill population. I went on to say that the local hospital charged for a vitrectomy was $12,000 and that my friends would be willing to contract for $3900. They responded with a requirement that I recruit doctors from other practices.

So the retinal surgeons I was working with created a business relationship with an optometry group to perform annual screenings. Since Medicaid had stopped paying for eye exams in non diabetics, many diabetics stopped scheduling their exams as they also thought their services were dropped. However NC Medicaid does cover optometry for persons with diabetes. I guess the messages have not been tested for clarity and understanding in the Medicaid population?

After spending 9 months working with this ophthalmology group to reach out and treat people who are literally going blind due to gaps in care, addressing the needs of the Managed Care Organization (Community Care of North Carolina or CCNC) and following up with additional requests for an audience with their primary care physicians we received no follow through from CCCNC and we have continued to treat diabetics as they trickle in from primary care and emergency room practices with acute retinal hemorrhage and vision loss.

I imagine this is a political issue, as irrational behavior in healthcare systems is usually due to hidden agendas that go unseen in the public. Unseen you say! Yes the pun is intended.

We apologize to the impoverished diabetics of North Carolina, we are here for you, will  always assure you get the best care regardless of your capacity to pay.

If you need help visit this website and schedule an appointment. Taylor Retina Center

These folks saved my vision and I am sure they will save yours if you are able to get to them in time. I hope to have wider support and advertising from agencies trusted with reaching out to help you in the future. For now, no luck with Medicaid CCNC.

The images below illustrate a normal retina and a young 20 y/o diabetic woman with severe diabetic retinopathy as she appeared during her first visit to the clinic’s practice. One must appreciate how much retinal tissue can be lost before the patient notices the change. This is the underlying reason for annual – biannual screenings. When I interviewed the physicians they stated that 20 patients per year appear in their office with this level of injury who are insured by Medicaid or have no insurance at all. They have never denied treatment. Since they own their laser and have ownership in a day surgery center they are also able to address the financial concerns of the operating room provider.

20 year old woman with severe disease                                                Normal Retina

severe retinopathy

A normal retina

 

 

 

 

An expression of gratitude for my first $28,000 bottle of Harvoni!

Can believe NC?

Can believe NC?

Last week I published my offer to not accept resuscitation services in exchange for a full course of treatment with Harvoni, the new Direct Acting Antiviral from Gilead that has demonstrated a 95% cure rate in Hepatitis C patients with genotype 1.

In most cases insurance companies, Medicaid and Medicare is not paying for the medication unless the patient has end stage cirrhosis and is queued for transplant. The reason is easy to understand from an economic perspective yet certainly Draconian when it comes to well over 2 million people in the US who suffer with this debilitating illness. Furthermore the price discrepancy between countries is 94 X when comparing egypt and the USA for example. 

In the US a 1 month supply of Harvoni is $30,000; in Egypt it is $320.00

For more, please see my slide presentation below. For now, I want to thank Federal Employee Blue Cross for covering this medication as well as my much needed continuous ambulatory blood sugar equipment which makes this diabetic completely able bodied when away from home and alone.

 

 

I do not know how or why I was approved. Neither does my hepatology doctor. Both he and I were in tears when the fax came in through his prior approval desk. I am now in my third day of therapy. 

All I did was write a story on my blog and link it to facebook, linkedin, twitter etc. Within 24 hours my friends at Humana had retweeted my message and called me to see if they could help. They were not even my insurance company but this is a great example of how some payers are monitoring the internet for clients in need. 

Human did not get back to me but within two more days we had the approval from Federal Employee Blue Cross (my wifes health insurance). Since they are acting as secondary to my Ordinary Medicare the authorization was up to them. 

So whoever you are at Blue Cross, this is one lucky American who thanks you for the generosity to step outside most payers protocol and save my life. 

What a Christmas Present. 

 

THE POST FROM LAST WEEK

I will happily select a DNR status if you pay for my Hep C Treatment 

Hopeful

Hopeful

An economic model for exchange of value between patient and payer.

 Dear America,

I have been notified by both Medicare and Blue Cross that the technology I use for tracking my blood sugar trends will no longer be covered.

I have been notified by both Medicare and Blue Cross that the antiviral medication which has come on the market to cure my Hepatitis C will not be covered.

I would like to negotiate for coverage of these technologies using my history as a patient and known economic data regarding the cost of care at the end of life as a proposed value exchange. 

I understand that the insurance industry AND public sector should grind their teeth when presented with the $1000 per pill cost of the new therapy’s. I also imagine payers are stratifying patients needing transplant for first access to care since the drugs work on damaged livers. What I do not understand is the 287/1 disparity in cost between America and Egypt?

 

A Chronic Disease Patient Reports On e-HR and p-HR utility

 

Reconciling data in my six health portals

Reconciling data in my six health portals

I will be attending the PCPCC annual conference next week and moderating a session on Do It Yourself Primary Care Medical Homes.

Most of my time of late has been attending to my ‘case’ as the demands of self-management are now more complex with the advent of new tools which were to lighten our load. Nowadays I spend at lease two hours each week keeping my 4 p-HRs up to date across four specialty physicians.

Why you ask? Well it appears that someone forgot to turn on the ‘interoperability switch’. I am sure it is here somewhere, I just can’t find it. I know the standards were written for certification purposes, I even have a copy of them. For some reason, here in metropolitan RTP North Carolina: Duke, Wake Med and UNC have all established contracts with Epic. The physicians that I use are independent and they have all chosen AllSCRIPTS and this is my patient experience.

NOTHING CONNECTS

I HAVE AN EPIC MY CHART PORTAL AT UNC

I HAVE ANOTHER EPIC MYCHART PORTAL AT DUKE

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS-MEDFUSION PORTAl AT GARNER INTERNAL MEDICINE

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS MEDFUSION PORTAL AT SOUTHERN DERMATOLOGY

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS PORTAL WITH NO MED FUSION AT NC CARDIOLOGY

I HAVE AN ALLSCRIPTS PORTAL WITH NO MED FUSION AT MY ENDOCRINOLOGIST

I HAVE A HEALTHVAULT PORTAL ATTACHED TO LABCORP AND SURESCRIPTS

 I AM UNABLE TO TRANSFER CCR S BETWEEN RECORDS

THE FACILITIES ARE NOT TRANSFERRING THE RECORDS

OUR TAXPAYERS SUPPOSEDLY BUILT THE NCHIE TO CONNECT TO ALL PROVIDERS

I started out on this journey to reduce errors in medicine in 1997. Why are we still here? Please don’t blame it on Obama, Bush, Clinton; well you get the picture.

Here is my ‘secure message’ to my Medical Home

My recent note to my PCMH

My recent note to my PCMH

 

NC Senate : While the rest of the country profits from North Carolina’s success in Medicaid, you throw the baby out with the bathwater.

 

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

cmis_use

 

 

The graphic report (above right) comes from the CCNC data systems developed by the Community Care of North Carolina Program. It allows communities to identify and assist people in need of support or locate systemic problems such as high utilization rates in local emergency rooms. All of this stuff combined fits into the Medical Home Model that out senate suggests purging CCNC; Yet, as you will note below, this program is a locally managed;public-private joint venture that is used throughout the US to achieve cost reductions in health systems. Please read on:

Yet another testimony to the capability of a Medical Home framework to decrease cost and improve health outcomes was published in today’s NY Times.   Here are the data:

  • The payer: Care First Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • The population size: 1.1 Million!
  • The model: Medical Homes (Community Care of North Carolina an early adopter of this strategy)
  • The savings: $130 Million

The article goes on to explain that results have been mixed in Medical Home Evaluations, demonstrating a need to identify the components that are required to achieve such results.   However, The Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative Chief Executive Marci Neilson noted that the studies are showing promise as Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan demonstrated a $155 Million savings in Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalization through their Medical Home Program last year.   So here’s what I have to say to the Senate: WAKE UP… the people providing the knowledge and structure to the programs now receiving accolades from the media cut their teeth in North Carolina through a fifteen year joint effort between public and private industry. Then, after receiving national recognition they were asked to teach other States the basics of the Medical Home that will reduce cost and improve health outcomes.

  1. Local control with State support
  2. Physician directed care
  3. ACCURATE DATA published frequently, reviewed frequently, converted to focused interventions
  4. Care Coordination and patient education from within the physicians practice
  5. Frequent regional meetings to review success and make adjustments to work-flow and design.

Here is an example from years ago in Greensboro (CCNC ORAL REHYDRATION PROGRAM)  

  • The local Community Care Network discovered that many emergency room admissions were attributed to children experiencing dehydration when they had GI Flu.
  • The CCNC Network (Partnership 4 Health) created an oral rehydration program where they reached out to the community of working mothers who would come home to a child experiencing diarrhea and vomiting.
  • As they engaged the family they taught the mothers to rehydrate their children using pedialyte.
  • They distrusted the rehydration kits to physician practices, public health departments and elsewhere.
  • The people started treating their children at home as opposed to the emergency room.
  • The Medicaid emergency department visit rate for GI distress fell and the tax-payers saved money.
  • All of this with happier children as the most important outcome in my opinion.

So what do you think NC Senate?   How about we keep what works!!! If you need further illustration there are a few thousand of us who would be pleased to teach you: Republicans, Democrats, and Independents alike. 

More on the land of Oz (North Carolina)

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

Heck! With health insurance we can afford a cup of coffee!

It is so unfortunate that the Senate has demonstrated such ignorance of the systems in NC that have provided frequently cited information on the cost benefit associated with Medical Homes.

I came here in 2001 to work with Community Care of NC following the sale of my company to Aetna Health. The technology we sold allowed Medicare Advantage Programs to identify, target and engage at-risk seniors through referral to primary care case management. It was clear at that time that the lessons learned from the world of HMO managed care had reached the end of their useful life as physicians had learned about the concepts of cost control through limiting redundant procedures and using evidence based guidelines in the 1980’s. The 1990’s brought us minimal returns in Disease Management which was the initial model deployed by Carolina Access’s efforts in Asthma and Diabetes population management activities. Those in the US that were on the cusp of ‘the next big thing’ were organizing for Primary Care Case Management through regional networks. I had spent 1999-2001 making presentations to the likes of Aetna, United Health Care, PACE and Empire Blue Cross to sell our intellectual property. If the commercial insurance industry understood the value of the marriage of technology with Medical Homes in 2001 it was a sure bet that our entire delivery system was on the verge of major payment reform.

Having had these successes in the private sector, my wife and I moved to NC after learning about the evolving Medicaid program which ultimately was titled Community Care of NC. We had a sincere desire to see a replication of a successful private industry venture through the public systems of care.

Since I was from the ‘evil private sector ‘I often heard ridicule from folks working in public programs here in NC. However; the willingness of these people to adopt information technologies that would increase their understanding of the Medicaid population and facilitate the design of delivery systems to tackle specific risks for the State of NC and separate regionally-managed community centered action plans for twelve regional networks was undoubtedly supported by the experts and General Assembly alike. Since that time it has become clear to all who work in the field of population health and disease management that the involvement of local providers, patients, payers and institutions in the creation of these programs is critical to the success in terms of both return on investment and quality of care.

So here we are: Those of us fortunate enough to work with these teams learned many lessons. When I left CCNC in 2006 I worked nationally, implementing similar programs across multiple states. I frequently heard how impressed various leaders in healthcare were with North Carolina’s success at improving the health of persons with diabetes and asthma as well as making a significant dent in the inflation rate in NC Medicaid when compared with other States.

So why would the Senate disband a working solution. I witnessed the reports from various budget experts at the public forums held last spring and noted a general lack of proper methodology when reporting cost data. For example: There was no evidence of proper control group selection and illness burden adjustment. When I stated to a former Senate member who happened to be a surgeon the errors in the reports used by the committee to compare cost benefit he agreed with me and stated “We really are not sure what questions to ask”: Yet the citizens of NC place their trust in this group to reform Medicaid.

Of course, when the public was asked for input, the decision was made to keep the existing program. Obviously many became clearer on the benefits. Then, out of left field comes enough controversy and distrust to once again, throw out the baby with the bath water.

Now that I am retired the muzzle of political correctness is no longer relevant. So here is some more feedback that is based on actual happenings in my life since working in NC.

I returned two weeks ago from the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative, a 10 year old group spawned from the private sector in response to the escalating costs of care in this country along with the fact that we are rated far down the line in healthcare outcomes when compared with at least seven other industrialized nations; few of whom conform to what we like to think of as traditional socialist thinking. I hold a co-chair position with this group and have gratitude for hearing the current thinking of the ‘best and brightest’   a club of economists and CEOs which I certainly do not qualify for membership.

During the conference a lead executive in a fortune 100 company along with several others from other organizations respected by all who read the Wall Street Journal told me that he had been asked to consult with the Governor’s office after the GA changed its mind about Medicaid outsourcing. He asked me what I thought and I gave him feedback on my personal observations of the successes achieved by Community Care of NC and told him a story about a similar plan assembled in Chicago in 2007 where I had a consulting contract. The Chicago plan failed since the commercial HMO and technology vendor had not developed succinct written requirements. I recall the meetings as if they were yesterday: Especially the frustration I exhibited in public when I found out that the HMO had not connected with the Medicaid primary care providers in Chicago prior to submitting their proposal. So here I had evidence of a public –private partnership success story in NC and private failure in Chicago.

My business friends that had reviewed the politics and business cases in NC for our Governor had all recommended that the State keep CCNC and the Accountable Care Organization models that had been promised only two months ago. Unfortunately their actual comment to me was: “Sorry Jeff, we do not understand the logic, the drivers appear to be something other than cost and quality. Perhaps it is time for you to leave.

What more can I say. The Senate’s budget is counter-intuitive yet those who are emotionally trapped by their opinions concerning the ACA seem unwilling to discuss the details as to why it makes no sense.

Does the GA realize that the Triad had a huge problem with mothers using the emergency room when their children became dehydrated from GI influenza and that the local CCNC network assembled a clinic to educate mothers to master the task of orally rehydrating their kids when they were sick which brought down the ER visit rate to almost nil?  How do they think an HMO will be able to address local needs with such specific detail and provide educational resources?

I have had diabetes for 48 years. I remember when Blue Cross sent my refrigerator magnets to remind me to have tests performed and monitor my blood-sugar. I have no idea how much my employer paid for that Disease Management Service but I do know that I had to argue for my insulin pump in 1984: The one tool that I attribute my lifespan to today.

I will close with this:

For the last six months I have been working with some private practice ophthalmologists who are willing to treat Medicaid diabetics. Many specialists will not treat Medicaid patients due to the lower reimbursement but these folks are a dream team. I assembled a program description and took it to the NC Medicaid Medical Home leadership to get their feedback. They were very pleased to see local people getting involved with creating specialty networks that would treat their patients. Why? Well we have a problem with diabetics becoming blind if they are on Medicaid due to inadequate access to specialty care. So here I was offering a bundled service at ½ the commercial rate charged by the hospital next door.

Unfortunately, I have had to place the project on hold. One of our major criteria for inclusion in the retina service for diabetics is that they are tethered to a Medical Home. As of a few weeks ago I can no longer assume we will have a relationship with a Medical Home enterprise.